Saturday, October 27, 2012

My Needle Felted Daisy Shadow Box Flower Picture



One of the needle felting flower molds I had bought that I was anxious to try was the Daisy Needle Felting Applique Mold By The Each, which is shown below.

After my sister went home from our needle felting adventure I decided to try creating a daisy using the Daisy Needle Felting Applique Mold By The Each I had bought and using the wonderful alpaca roving from her alpaca Sunflower.

Compared to some of the cheap roving I had been using some of which I really think was dyed raw mohair packaged as 100% wool roving Sunflower's white roving was exceptional.  It was beautifully white, fine, free of debris, and just plain exceptional to use.


The instructions and packaging of the Daisy Needle Felting Applique Mold By The Each were similar to the instructions and packaging of the Clover Applique Mold, Rose Design mentioned above so please see my comments on my Needle Felted Pink Rose and Multi-Colored Purple Rose Mini Pictures  post as they would be the same for the Clover daisy mold and all the rest of the Clover molds I bought.

Once again, I had decided to add a stem to my daisy as I wanted to enclose this needle felted flower within a  6" by 6" by 2" unfinished wood shadowbox that I had bought with a 5 1/4" by 5 1/4" opening. I pulled a 6" long and 1" wide piece of the lime green roving that I was using for my daisy's leaves and using the pen style needle felting tool and needle felting mat just kept rolling it and felting the lime green roving until I had a long stem about 5" long and about 1/2" wide that was pretty dense. Using the single needle felt needle I felted the leaves I had created for my daisy to the left and right sides of the middle of the stem with one leaf slightly higher than the other until they were secure and then I felted the top of the stem to the center back of my daisy.

I wanted to create a bright, sunny flower for the end of the Summer and early Fall season so I thought a Daisy would be perfect and envisioned it contained within a bright and cheery sponge painted shadowbox frame.

So, I painted the unfinished wood shadowbox (except the back inside wall) first with olive green acrylic paint and then sponge painted it with a combination of medium brown, dark olive green, yellow, and white acrylic paint.  Then I applied one coat of varnish.

I  cut a piece of yellow felt backing 5 1/4" by 5 1/4" and a piece of 1" of Nu-foam backing 5 1/4" by 5 1/4" and using the needle felting punch tool felted them together.  Then, using the pen style needle felting tool,  I needle felted my needle felted daisy flower with long felted stem in a curved manner to the yellow felt and Nu-foam. Once it was felted to the yellow felt and Nu-foam I used the single needle felting needle to securely felt it in place. After I was sure the daisy was securely felted to the yellow felt and Nu-foam I hot glued this to the inside back of the shadowbox frame that I had left unpainted.


I liked how my daisy turned out and think it will make a wonderful decoration for my late summer early Fall decor.  What do you think?

Linda's How-Do-I Series? How To Make Our Baby Nicky and It's A Boy! It's A Girl! Centerpiece Dolls Cut and Sew Favor Ornaments




Friday, October 26, 2012

Linda's How-Do-I Series? How To Make Our Twosome Baby Nicky and It's A Boy! It's A Girl! Centerpiece Dolls Cut and Sew Favor Ornaments




Linda's How-Do-I Series? How To Make Our "It's Raining Baby Showers" Tablecloths and Runners


Bright and cheery tablecloths and runners make a wonderful decoration for any baby shower. How can they not be when they're filled with bright pink and bright blue baby girl and baby boy colors?

Any of the fabrics in my LWOriginals “It’s Raining Baby Showers” fabric collections can be used to make tablecloths and runners.




For the tablecloth pictured above we used our It’s A Girl! It’s A Boy! 4 Designs Squares fabric.




For the runner pictured above we used our Baby Nicky Girl and Boy and It’s A Girl! It’s A Boy! Squares fabric.

The amount of fabric you will need will depend upon whether you are making tablecloths or runners, how much you want the tablecloths to overhang the table, how big the tables are, and how many tables you are going to cover. Measure accordingly then by the number of yards of fabric that you will need.

Each of our tables and runners have lace around the edges so you should buy enough lace trim to go around all the edges of all the tablecloths and runners you are making and provide a 1 1/2” overlap on the ends.

My Linda's How-Do-I Series? How To Make Our Baby Nicky and It's A Boy! It's A Girl! Centerpiece Dolls Cut and Sew Favor Ornaments E-Book is a 4-page e-book that shows you how to make my tablecloth and runner. They are really easy to make. You're going to love decorating your baby shower with them. Plus, they can be used afterwards by the mother-to-be as doilies for babies bureaus, etc.

Have fun making your tablecloths and runners.

Thursday, October 25, 2012

Linda's How-Do-I Series? How To Make A Two Ribbon Combination Loopy Bow Decoration


Linda's How-Do-I Series? How To Make Our "It's Raining Baby Showers" Cut and Sew 5" by 5" Cube Decorations E-Book


How I Made My Needle Felted White and Multi-Colored White/Burgundy Rose Pictures


Since my pink and multi-colored purple roses had come out so well I decided to create an all white rose and multi-colored white/burgundy rose using some of my sister's alpaca, Sunflower's beautiful white roving.


As I was used to the rose mold by now I had no problem putting the white rose together except I was still breaking needles. The needle felting needles do tend to break very, very easily. I ended up going through 2 more needles before I was finished with all my roses. If you're going to embark on a needle felting adventure be sure to buy lots, and lots of replacement needles as you are going to need them.


My sister and I had bought some 6" by 8" unfinished picture frames with 3 1/2" by 5 1/2" picture opening that I thought would look nice when finished with my white rose and multi-colored white/burgundy rose.  Once again,  I had decided that gluing them within the picture frame area and having them projecting out of the frame would be a nice way to finish these roses.

For these two roses, however, I wanted them to appear to be long stemmed roses so I needed to create a long needle felted stem for each.

I pulled a 6" long and 1" wide piece of the green felting that I was using for this particular rose's leaves and using the pen style needle felting tool and needle felting mat just kept rolling it and felting the green roving until I had a long stem about 5" long and about 1/2" wide that was pretty dense. Using the single needle felt needle I felted the leaves I had created for this rose to the left and right sides of the middle of the stem until they were secure and then I felted the top of the stem to the back of the white rose.

I thought my needle felted white rose would look nice with a light blue felt backing and complementary blue sponged frame so I painted the frame first with light blue acrylic paint and then sponge painted it with a combination of medium blue, lilac, yellow, and white acrylic paint.  Then I applied one coat of varnish.

I added the light blue felt backing and a small amount of batting to the 3 1/2" by 5 1/2" picture opening as backing for my rose and then hot glued my rose to the felt.


I was so pleased with the way the white rose came out that I decided to use Sunflower's white roving and some nice  burgundy colored roving I had previously bought to create a multi-colored burgundy and white rose.


I used the other 6" by 8" unfinished picture frame with 3 1/2" by 5 1/2" picture opening that I had bought for my multi-colored white/burgundy rose. Once again, I had decided that gluing it within the picture frame area and having it project out of the frame would be a nice way to finish this rose.

However, I wanted this rose to be more festive for the upcoming Christmas holiday season. So, I decided to back this long stemmed rose with dark red felt and finish the frame with holiday colors.

I pulled a 6" long and 1" wide piece of the dark olive green felting that I was using for this particular rose's leaves and using the pen style needle felting tool and needle felting mat just kept rolling it and felting the dark olive green roving until I had a long stem about 5" long and about 1/2" wide that was pretty dense. Using the single needle felt needle I felted the leaves I had created for this rose to the left and right sides of the middle of the stem until they were secure and then I felted the top of the stem to the back of the multi-colored white/burgundy rose.

I thought my needle felted multi-colored white/burgundy rose would look nice with a dark red felt backing and complementary dark red sponged frame so I painted the frame first with dark red acrylic paint and then sponge painted it with a combination of burgundy, Christmas green, Christmas red, and white acrylic paint. Then I applied one coat of varnish.

I added the dark red felt backing and a small amount of batting to the 3 1/2" by 5 1/2" picture opening as backing for my rose and then hot glued my rose to the felt.


I like how they both long stemmed roses turned out and will probably create some more of the roses as the mold is really easy to use and adding the long stem was just a matter of rolling and felting the roving. Once you get the hang of it that is pretty easy to do as well.

Copyright © 2004 - 2019 - All Rights Reserved - Written By Linda Walsh of Linda's Blog. Linda is a doll maker and doll pattern designer.

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Linda's How-Do-I Series? How To Embroider A Basic Chain Stitch and Lazy Daisy Flower Free E-Book




If you've always wanted to learn how to embroider a basic chain stitch and lazy daisy flower stitch check out my "How To Embroider A Basic Chain Stitch and Lazy Daisy Flower Free E-Book."

Needle Felted Pink Rose and Multi-Colored Purple Rose Mini Pictures


Before my sister's visit for our needle felting craft adventure I had decided to buy some of the Clover needle felting applique molds I had previously seen.  One of the molds I had bought was the Clover Applique Mold, Rose Design.

While my sister was working on her free style needle felted landscape design I decided to try creating a pink rose using the rose mold.

The mold contained two large front and back sheets with instructions.  The two sheets looked a little cumbersome at first until I realized there were different languages on each sheet.  So, I had to find the English section.  While I can understand the cost effectiveness of doing this it's not the most user friendly approach and makes the instructions seem way too complicated.

One of the large sheets also contained basic punching text and pictorial information for the various sizes and pieces of their molds and how to use them with the roving which I found to be very helpful.

The instructions for using the particular mold were of a text and pictorial nature and once I found the English version they were easy to follow.  They recommended in the instructions using their molds with the Clover Pen Style Needle Felting Tool and either the Clover Felting Needle Mat Small or the Clover Felting Needle Mat Large.

I soon realized that some of the pieces of the the molds were pretty tiny so only the single felting needle or Clover Pen Style Needle Felting Tool would work. I had previously bought a large foam felting block but soon realized that the molds did work the best with the Clover Felting Needle Mat Large.

I had no problem putting the pink rose together except I quickly found out that the needles for the Clover Pen Style Needle Felting Tool break very, very easily.  I ended up going through 4 needles before I was finished with all my flowers.  If you're going to embark on a needle felting adventure be sure to buy lots, and lots of replacement needles as you are going to need them.


Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Needle Felted Flower Garden Shadow Box Tray Picture Free E-Pattern




For my last needle felted flower creation I decided I wanted to create a flower garden scene using a combination of the dark blue and dark green 100% wool felt 12" by 12" needle felted sheets I had bought felted to a backing of Nu-foam.

My flower garden picture was going to have a blue sky with white clouds, green grass, and brown soil.  To create the soil I decided to use some of the wonderful medium brown alpaca roving from my sister's alpaca, Ivy.  For the white clouds in the sky I decided to use some of the wonderful white alpaca roving from my sister's alpaca, Sunflower.  All of this I was going to enclose in a 8 3/4" by 6 1/4" by 2" deep unfinished shadowbox tray sponge painted with lively spring colors.

I decided to create the needle felted flowers using stainless steel flower cookie cutter molds that I had. The flower cookie cutter molds came in a 3/4", 1", and 2" and larger sizes.  I also decided to use a 1" leaf from a set of stainless steel leaf molds that I also had.

I also wanted my flowers to be combination of multi-layers of petals and a single layer of petals.  I wanted the flowers and leaves to be different colors and for some of the flowers to have stems.  I decided to use medium blue, dark blue, lilac, purple, pink, black, apricot roving, white alpaca roving from Sunflower, and medium brown alpaca roving from Ivy.  Lime green roving and sage green roving would be the colors for the flowers leaves.

I was pleased with the way my needle felted flower picture turned out and decided to create and e-pattern out of it so you could create a needle felted flower picture of your own.

My pattern includes tips for needle felting, step-by-step instructions for completing my flower picture, a colored flower picture instruction steps sheet so you can see what piece belongs to what step, and a colored flower picture layout sheet that is approximately the size of your needle felted flower picture. 

Designer - Linda Walsh Originals 

I hope you like my needle felted flower picture and hope you decide to create one of your own.





To view and download my free e-book please CLICK HERE. You'll be brought to Google Drive where you can view my free e-book. Then just download my free .pdf e-book.

For more information on all my free e-patterns, e-printables and e-books please CLICK HERE.

Please respect My Terms of Use:  All patterns, e-patterns, printables, e-printables, e-books, graphics, tutorials, how-to's, articles and other e-products © 2004-2019 Linda Walsh Originals-Designs by Linda Walsh. All rights reserved. Commercial selling or reselling by any means prohibited without the written consent of Linda Walsh.

Patterns, e-patterns, printables, e-printables, e-books, graphics, tutorials, how-to's, articles and other e-products are for personal use only. You may not modify, photocopy, download, upload, post, transmit, display, perform, publish, license, reprint, create derivative works from, mass duplicate, re-sell, digitize, and reproduce in any other form (print, digital or electric) or commercially apply, embed, share, Email, or redistribution in any other means. Use of any of the above is prohibited without the written permission of Linda Walsh.

However, you may link to my website(s)/blog(s) and the individual page(s)/blog post(s) (including 1 picture) but do not copy, reprint or duplicate my website(s)/blog(s) or individual page(s)/post(s ) without my permission.

Items made from Linda Walsh Originals E-Patterns are intended for personal use for fun or small scale personal and business profit as long as you credit us with the design. Large scale commercial use (i.e. mass production) of items made from Linda Walsh Originals E-Patterns are by permission only.

Please see my Terms and Conditions for additional information.

Copyright © 2004 - 2019 - All Rights Reserved - Written By Linda Walsh of Linda Walsh Originals and Linda's Blog. Linda is a doll maker and doll pattern designer.

Monday, October 22, 2012

Deb's Southwestern Needle Felted Shadow Box Tray Scene



After my sister and I had gotten a feel for the roving from our Dimensions snowman and penguin needle felting kits we decided we wanted to create some free style needle felted pictures. I decided on a conservative, less challenging winter snowman and tree scene while she embarked on a daring landscape scene the beginnings of which is shown below.


My sister wanted her free style needle felting picture to be some sort of mountain scene with trees, sun, mountains, grasslands and a moose which she's working on in the picture below.


She worked on her scene for quite sometime while I was experimenting with some of the flower molds. All of a sudden I notice out of the corner of my eye that she was ripping felting off her picture. That's the beauty of needle felted crafts if you don't like something just rip it out! So, she did. Rip! Rip!

I didn't realize what she had ripped out until I heard whimpering and then saw the following on my work area:


It was the baby moose. She had ripped the baby moose out of her free style needle felted scene. The poor guy! Just ripped right out......

I really felt bad for him and asked her what happened. She replied that she didn't like it so out he came! Poor baby moosey.....

He was still whimpering after she finished her scene with flowers instead of a moose. Poor baby moosey....

I could see that she was pleased with the flowers and how her scene had turned out. I had to admit it was nice, but poor baby moosey.....

We wanted to use some of the unfinished wood trays we had bought as shadow boxes for our pictures and after trimming her scene a little the medium sized tray worked like a charm as you can see from the picture below:


So, she left it for me to sponge paint and moved on to another free hand style creation. This time it was a gingerbread man that she made using her alpaca, Ivy's, wonderful medium brown roving.
.

She worked on it for a while until she got it just right and was pleased with him when she was finished.  He had really turned out quite cute so she decided to take him home with her.  In fact, he had a place of honor in the passenger seat for the ride home.

All the while this was going on I could hear whimpering in the background.  I had moved baby moosey to a different spot so she couldn't throw him away.  I just felt so bad for him.  Poor baby moosey....

After my sister went home and I had finished with the other needle felted free style pictures I was creating I decided to sponge paint all the unfinished frames and shadowboxes we were using for the needle felted crafts we had made.   I sponge painted my sister's scene with a dark brown base with burgundy, light brown, green, and light gray sponged highlights.

I really liked the way it turned out (which is shown in the picture below) and thought the shadowbox tray really enhanced her free style picture.  I hope she does, too!


I had put all the sponge painted projects I had completed on my dining room table over night so I could take pictures of them the next morning.

After setting up the backdrop for my pictures and setting up my camera I put my sister's southwestern shadow box tray on the counter and this is what I saw through the lens:


It was baby moosey. He had found a way to be part of her scene after all.

If you get a chance please check out my sister's Rock Garden Alpacas Etsy Shop where she sells her alpaca fiber and handmade alpaca fiber products.

Linda's How-Do-I Series? How To Blanket Stitch Free E-Book



How To Blanket Stitch Free E-Book

If you've always wanted to learn how to embroider a blanket stitch check out my "How To Blanket Stitch Free E-Book" here.

The Needle Felted Flowers


In anticipation of my sister's visit and our needle felting adventure I had decided to buy some of the Clover needle felting applique molds I had previously seen. 

While my sister was working on her free style needle felted landscape design I decided to try creating a pink rose (shown above) using the Clover Applique Mold, Rose Design (shown above).

The mold contained two large front and back sheets with instructions.  The two sheets looked a little cumbersome at first until I realized there were four different languages on each sheet.  So, I had to find the English section.  While I can understand the cost effectiveness of doing this it's not the most user friendly approach and makes the instructions seem way too complicated.

The instructions were of a text and pictorial nature and once I found the English version they were easy to follow.  They recommended in the instructions using the molds with the Clover Pen Style Needle Felting Tool (shown below) and either the Clover Felting Needle Mat Small or the Clover Felting Needle Mat Large.

I soon realized that some of the pieces of the the molds were pretty tiny so only the single felting needle or Clover Pen Style Needle Felting Tool would work. I had previously bought a large foam felting block but soon realized that the molds did work the best with the Clover Felting Needle Mat Large.

I had no problem putting the pink rose together except I quickly found out that the needles for the Clover Pen Style Needle Felting Tool break very, very easily. I ended up going through 8 needles before I was finished with all my flowers. If you're going to embark on a needle felting adventure be sure to buy lots, and lots of replacement needles as you are going to need them.

I was pleased with the way my pink rose came out but my sister thought it was boring (plus I had used up all the pink roving - bad sister!) so I decided to try a multi-colored purple rose next.


I was pleased with the way both of my roses came out and pleased with the Clover rose mold, despite the 2 page instructions.

After my sister went home I decided to try creating a daisy using the Daisy Needle Felting Applique Mold By The Each I had bought and using the wonderful alpaca roving from her alpaca Sunflower.  Compared to some of the cheap roving I had been using some of which I really think was dyed raw mohair packaged as 100% wool roving Sunflower's white roving was exceptional.  It was beautifully white, fine, without bits and pieces of non-roving materials, and just plain exceptional to use.


The instructions and packaging of the Daisy Needle Felting Applique Mold By The Each were similar to the instructions and packaging of the Clover Applique Mold, Rose Design mentioned above so please see my comments there as they would be the same for the Clover daisy mold and all the rest of the Clover molds I bought.

I was pleased with the way the daisy came out and decided to use Sunflower's white roving to create a pure white rose.


Since the pure white rose had come out so well I decided to use Sunflower's white roving and some nice  burgundy colored roving I had previously bought to create a multi-colored burgundy and white rose.


My sister and I had some unfinished picture frames that I thought would look nice when finished with my felted flowers.

Since I was having such luck with the roving I was using and with the molds I decided to use a combination of the rose design petals upside down, the daisy design leaves, and the floret and berries berries to create a red Poinsettia.

I had to play around with the shapes a little and improvise here and there with my Poinsettia, but overall I was pleased with the way it turned out.


I decided to write separate blog posts for my flowers and tell you what I had to do, the problems I ran into, and what I was thinking as I went along. My posts will be following so please return to find out how I finished all of the above. I think you'll be a little surprised as to how they all came out.

If you get a chance please check out my sister's Rock Garden Alpacas Etsy Shop where she sells her alpaca fiber and handmade alpaca fiber products.

Copyright © 2004 - 2019 - All Rights Reserved - Written By Linda Walsh of Linda's Blog. Linda is a doll maker and doll pattern designer.

Needle Felted Church Shadow Box Picture Free E-Pattern



One of the free style needle felted pictures that I wanted to create a couple of years ago was a needle felted church scene that I made using the wonderful white roving that my sister had given me from her alpaca Sunflower.  She and her husband are the owners of Rock Garden Alpacas and Rock Garden Alpacas Fiber.

I thought it would be nice to create a mountain type church winter scene with a church, evening stars, mountain range, evergreen trees, and oak tree and then create a free e-pattern so you could create one of your own.


At the last minute I decided to add the Dimensions Needlecrafts Needle Felted Character Kit, Snowman that I had created and blogged about and reviewed in a Linda's Blog post entitled Dimensions Needle Felted Snowman Kit as I thought he looked cute with the scene.

However, my free e-pattern does not include directions for making the Dimensions snowman. You will have to purchase the Dimensions Needlecrafts Needle Felted Character Kit, Snowman yourself if you want to add him to your needle felted picture.

My free e-pattern includes tips for needle felting, step-by-step instructions for completing my church winter scene picture (minus the snowman), a colored church picture instruction steps sheet so you can see what piece belongs to what step, a colored church picture layout sheet that is the actual size of your needle felted church picture, and pattern pieces.

Designer - Linda Walsh Originals

I hope you like my needle felted church picture and hope you decide to create one of your own.


To view and download my free e-book please CLICK HERE. You'll be brought to Google Drive where you can view my free e-book. Then just download my free .pdf e-book.

For more information on all my free e-patterns, e-printables and e-books please CLICK HERE.

Please respect My Terms of Use:  All patterns, e-patterns, printables, e-printables, e-books, graphics, tutorials, how-to's, articles and other e-products © 2004-2019 Linda Walsh Originals-Designs by Linda Walsh. All rights reserved. Commercial selling or reselling by any means prohibited without the written consent of Linda Walsh.

Patterns, e-patterns, printables, e-printables, e-books, graphics, tutorials, how-to's, articles and other e-products are for personal use only. You may not modify, photocopy, download, upload, post, transmit, display, perform, publish, license, reprint, create derivative works from, mass duplicate, re-sell, digitize, and reproduce in any other form (print, digital or electric) or commercially apply, embed, share, Email, or redistribution in any other means. Use of any of the above is prohibited without the written permission of Linda Walsh.

However, you may link to my website(s)/blog(s) and the individual page(s)/blog post(s) (including 1 picture) but do not copy, reprint or duplicate my website(s)/blog(s) or individual page(s)/post(s ) without my permission.

Items made from Linda Walsh Originals E-Patterns are intended for personal use for fun or small scale personal and business profit as long as you credit us with the design. Large scale commercial use (i.e. mass production) of items made from Linda Walsh Originals E-Patterns are by permission only.

Please see my Terms and Conditions for additional information.

Copyright © 2004 - 2019 - All Rights Reserved - Written By Linda Walsh of Linda Walsh Originals and Linda's Blog. Linda is a doll maker and doll pattern designer.

Saturday, October 20, 2012

The 1st Placemats I Ever Made



The other day when I posted about my Delightful Fall Decorations I failed to tell you that two of the pictures showed the very first place-mats I ever made.  I made them some 42+ years ago for my Mother for her fall decorating.

Back then I liked to decorate her dining room table with a Fall floral centerpiece.  I didn't have any money to buy something and they didn't quite have the kinds of silk floral back then as they do today so I fashioned something I may have gathered from the woods.  Pine-cones, bark, acorns, ferns, pine needles, etc.

Well, one year after Thanksgiving I decided a set of eight place-mats and a little runner would be nice and thought they would make a nice Christmas present.  So, I made them for her and gave them to her for Christmas.  Of course, she had to wait a year to use them.  So, what's a few months.....

I thought for sure my sister would notice the place-mats in the pictures. I know my Mother would have noticed.


They were my first attempt at sewing linens and I made them out of quilted fall fabrics. There were eight of them in a diagonal shape. I tried to get them to all be the same size, but some were a little bigger and some were a little smaller.


I put them out now with my Fall decorations as they are the perfect color for my dining room and because I know my mother would be pleased.

They All Have A Different Needle Felting Use!


In anticipation of my sister's visit for working on her websites and learning all we could about roving I decided to add to the tools and supplies I had from a few years ago when I had done a small amount of needle felting on a penny rug picture.

If you don;t know what needle felting is it is basically using a single or multiple needle tool to mesh the fibers of roving into itself to form an object or shape, mesh the roving into another piece of felted roving to create an object, or mesh the roving into a piece of wool felt to create an object or picture.

You can freely shape the roving yourself using needle felting tools or use needle felt molds or cookie cutters to shape the roving into the desired object.

In looking at needle felting it seemed like there were a lot of different tools and supplies needed to do needle felting. I wondered if I needed them all and soon found out I did as they all have a different use.

I already had a medium size Clover felting mat but wanted a larger one so I bought a Clover Felting Needle Mat Large.

Friday, October 19, 2012

Needle Felted Winter Snowman &Tree Picture


I had a lot of fun making my needle felted snowman and tree picture and thought you might like to make one of your own so I created a free e-pattern for him, which is here.

Free Style Needle Felted Pictures


After my sister of Rock Garden Alpacas and I had gotten a feel for the roving from our Dimensions snowman and penguin needle felting kits we decided we wanted to create some free style needle felted pictures. I decided on a conservative, less challenging winter snowman and tree scene (shown above) while she embarked on a daring landscape scene the beginnings of which is shown below.


After my sister's visit I decided to try my hand at some free style needle felted pictures.  I had wanted to create a flower garden using some of the flower molds I had bought and to create a Fall scene using the pumpkin cookie cutters I had bought.


So, I started with the flower garden first and some of the Clover needle felting applique molds I had bought.

Both my sister and I had heard that cookie cutters worked just as well as molds for felting so we bought a few of those. I wanted to try a pumpkin patch scene using the Wilton cookie cutter pumpkins that were part of the following Wilton Harvest 6 Piece Mini Metal Cookie Cutter Set:



I had decided for my third free style needle felting picture to not use any molds and just free hand design it.


Both my sister and I had thought that the free style needle felted pictures would be nice if we enclosed them in shadow boxes or shadow box trays so we bought some unfinished wood to do so.

I decided to write separate blog posts for each of my designs and tell you what I had to do, the problems I ran into, and what I was thinking as I went along. My posts will be following so please return to find out how I finished all of the above. I think you'll be a little surprised as to how they all came out.

My sister wanted her free style needle felting picture to be some sort of mountain scene with trees, sun, mountains, grasslands and a moose.  I'll leave that up to her to shown you how it came out and blog about what she had to do, the problems she ran into, and what she was thinking as she went along.  Maybe she'll even tell you about her adventures with the needle felted moose.