Saturday, March 21, 2015

The History of Faceless Dolls - Updated February 2015

I have loved Victorian dolls since I was a little girl and can blame my grandmother for that. You see, as a young girl she gave me a Godey’s Fashion print for August 1870 that belonged to my great, great Aunt Flossie. From that moment on I was hooked. I was captivated by the beautiful dresses and wanted to create dolls wearing them.

Eventually I was able to design my own Victorian "Lady" dolls, like the one pictured on the left, who are all faceless. Now you might be wondering why they are faceless. It's because I wanted each to have its' own distinct personality.

My feeling is that faces overwhelm the dolls personality and have a greater impact on their personality. I wanted the clothing, clothes, hair, color scheme, etc. of the period to determine the personality of the doll.

As far as I am concerned "Beauty lies not only in what is seen, but what is imagined. I believe the essence of a dolls beauty should determine her personality."

You could compare this to the use of mannequins by museums. Most mannequins in museum dress & textile exhibits are either headless or have heads, but they are generally faceless. Or, they have the sculpted definition of facial features but they are not painted. The idea is to not distract from the beauty of the dress or textile piece on display. The same holds true for store window displays.

I have also been a history buff since I was a little girl and loved doing research for history projects all throughout my school years. I especially loved to research everything and anything about the Victorian Era. Their history, their etiquette, their fashion, their hopes, their desires.... In fact, sometimes I think I was born in the wrong era.

Designing handmade faceless dolls was not a novel idea as faceless dolls have been around for a long, long time. However, given my penchant for history I, of course, was curious about the history of faceless dolls. So, back in 2006 I decided to do a little research on the history of faceless dolls and wrote a research article for my Linda's Blog that I subsequently updated in 2009.

I figured that there had to be a history of handmade faceless dolls out there or, at least, some cultures and norms. Believe it or not but there wasn't a lot of information back in 2006 on the web on either the history of faceless dolls or cultures and norms that started such a tradition. There was a little more when I updated my research in 2009.

There was some information on two of the most popular and widely known faceless dolls - Amish dolls and corn husk dolls. And there was the legend surrounding Raggedy Ann and "faceless" dolls.

In doing my research, what I was pleasantly surprised with was the application of "faceless" dolls for so many current charities or organizations. More on that a little later.

I was hoping that now, in 2015, things would have changed a little and there would be more information on their history. I'm happy to report that there is a lot more now and that over the last few years there is a growing trend towards creating faceless dolls in all sorts of doll mediums - which thrills me to no end.

Part of the new trend has to do with creating eco-friendly and nature dolls and part has to do with allowing children to use their imagination more. It also has to do with comforting children facing tough medical situations. Without a face the dolls can be happy or sad, they can be laughing or crying - in essence, they can mimic the emotions of the child holding them. Putting a face on the doll defines the emotion of the doll with the child - which may or may not be comforting.

So, I decided to update my history of faceless dolls research article and include new research as well as some of the new trends. I hope you enjoy it.
























I also created a History Of Faceless Dolls .PDF.  If you would like to download my History Of Faceless Dolls .PDF please click here or on the picture below.


Copyright © 2004-2015- All Rights Reserved - Written by By Linda Walsh

I think you all know that I, personally, love faceless dolls. Victorians, primitives, colonial, prairie dolls, rag dolls, or country style dolls. It doesn't matter. I love them all.

In fact, I created a video to reflect my feelings about faceless dolls which is: "Beauty lies not only in what is seen, but what is imagined. I believe the essence of a dolls faceless beauty should determine her personality."

Please CLICK HERE or on the video below if you would like to view my "Linda's Faceless Beauties" video.


Why do I love the faceless doll so much?

Because I think by being "faceless' the doll can be anything you want him or her to be. You create the dolls personality to be exactly what you imagine it to be. Their personality, therefore, reflects your creativity and your feelings.

And, as we've seen from the above mentioned articles the application can be heartwarming, meaningful and beautiful.

In researching doing the research to update my History of Faceless Dolls article I was thrilled to see that there are hundreds of artists and crafters who are now creating various types of "faceless" dolls in all different medium. I couldn't be happier to see all these wonderful new applications for faceless dolls. I'm hoping you all will agree.

For more information on all my free e-patterns, e-printables and e-books please CLICK HERE.

Please respect My Terms of Use:  All patterns, e-patterns, printables, e-printables, e-books, graphics, tutorials, how-to's, articles and other e-products © 2004-2020 Linda Walsh Originals-Designs by Linda Walsh. All rights reserved. Commercial selling or reselling by any means prohibited without the written consent of Linda Walsh.

Patterns, e-patterns, printables, e-printables, e-books, graphics, tutorials, how-to's, articles and other e-products are for personal use only. You may not modify, photocopy, download, upload, post, transmit, display, perform, publish, license, reprint, create derivative works from, mass duplicate, re-sell, digitize, and reproduce in any other form (print, digital or electric) or commercially apply, embed, share, Email, or redistribution in any other means. Use of any of the above is prohibited without the written permission of Linda Walsh.

However, you may link to my website(s)/blog(s) and the individual page(s)/blog post(s) (including 1 picture) but do not copy, reprint or duplicate my website(s)/blog(s) or individual page(s)/post(s ) without my permission.

Items made from Linda Walsh Originals E-Patterns are intended for personal use for fun or small scale personal and business profit as long as you credit us with the design. Large scale commercial use (i.e. mass production) of items made from Linda Walsh Originals E-Patterns are by permission only.

Please see my Terms and Conditions for additional information.

Copyright © 2004 - 2020 - All Rights Reserved - Written By Linda Walsh of Linda Walsh Originals and Linda's Blog. Linda is a doll maker and doll pattern designer.

How To Make Our Baby Shower Gift Tags Free E-Printable




If you love our "It's Raining Baby Showers" Baby Store Gallery stickers and have downloaded our two free gift tags then you'll be happy to know that we have a free Linda's How-Do-I Series? How To Make Our Baby Shower Gift Tags #3 and #8 Tutorial showing you step by step how to create our tags.

Our tutorial utilizes our "It's Raining Baby Showers" Baby Store Gallery stickers and our free Baby Shower Gift Tag #3  or our  Baby Shower Gift Tag #8.

Here's how I made my tags:

How To Make Our Personalized Baby Shower Favor Tags Free E-Printable


If you love our personalized "It's Raining Baby Showers" Baby Shower Favor Stickers and have downloaded our free Baby Shower EPrintable Favor Tag1  and  Baby Shower EPrintable Favor Tag2 then you'll be happy to know that we've designed a step-by-step tutorial showing you how to create our "It's Raining Baby Showers" Baby Shower Favor tags.  With these you can personalize your favor tags with the honoree's name and date of shower and then tie them to your baby shower favor as a memento of the happy event.

Our tutorial utilizes our "It's Raining Baby Showers" Baby Shower Favor Sticker and our free Baby Shower EPrintable Favor Tag1  or our  Baby Shower EPrintable Favor Tag2.
Here's how to make them:

Supplies Needed:

Either of the following:

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Linda’s How-Do-I Series? How To Make Our Custom Fabric Wall Panel Picture New Free E-Book


I just love custom fabric.  Especially when it can be used to make quick and easy picture decorations and was so pleased with the way my Babies In The Pumpkin Patch Wall Panel Picture came out that when I was designing my Babies Splashing In the Rain Fabric Collection and Alpacas Rock Fabric Collection I decided to create several baby fabrics and one alpaca fabric that could be used to create several custom fabric panel pictures.

Last week I finally had some time to create some and decided to start with my Alpacas Brown Panel Fabric which creates a 9” by 12” custom fabric wall panel decoration. It was very easy to make so I proceeded to make my Babies Splashing In The Rain  Fabric Panel Small, my It’s Raining Baby Boys Fabric Panel, and my It’s Raining Baby Girls Fabric Panel.

Here's how I made my Alpacas Rock Custom Fabric Panel Picture:

SUPPLIES NEEDED


For The Alpacas Rock Custom Fabric Panel Picture

Fat Quarter Alpacas Brown Panel Fabric - https://www.spoonflower.com/designs/1951451
9" by 12" Stretched Cotton Canvas (I Used Artist's Loft)
9" by 12" Decorative Heavier Paper-stock For The Backing



For The Babies Splashing In the Rain Custom Fabric Panel Picture

Fat Quarter Babies Splashing In The Rain Fabric Panel-Small -https://www.spoonflower.com/fabric/1623197 (Design Updated - now blue in color)
11" by 14" Stretched Cotton Canvas (I Used Artist's Loft)
11" by 14" Decorative Heavier Paper-stock For The Backing



For The It’s Raining Baby Boys Custom Fabric Panel Picture

Fat Quarter It’s Raining Baby Boys Fabric Panel - https://www.spoonflower.com/fabric/1621246
8" by 10" Stretched Cotton Canvas (I Used Artist's Loft)
8" by 10" Decorative Heavier Paper-stock For The Backing



For The It’s Raining Baby Girls Custom Fabric Panel Picture

Fat Quarter It’s Raining Baby Girls Fabric Panel - https://www.spoonflower.com/fabric/1620718
8" by 10" Stretched Cotton Canvas (I Used Artist's Loft)
8" by 10" Decorative Heavier Paper-stock For The Backing

Other Supplies Needed For All Four

Linda's How-Do-I Series? How To Make A Fabric Covered Round Basket Free E-Book


Print165 - Linda's How-Do-I Series? How To Make A Fabric Covered Round Basket E-Book

Since I had just finished my Linda's Blog post on the fabric covered baskets I had made I thought you might enjoy a step-by-step "How-to" on how to make one of your own.

How To Make A Fabric Covered Basket - Updated March 2015

Supplies Needed

1 Small Round Basket With Handle - 3" Round
1/4 Yard Fabric - 36" Wide
1" Lace Trim - 16" Long
DMC Embroidery Floss
Sewing Thread
Dual Temperature Glue Gun
Glue Sticks
Measuring Tape
Large Plain Piece Of Paper
Iron

Instructions

(Note - These instructions are for ADULT use only as they require the use of a hot glue gun. Always use caution when working with any kind of hot glue gun.)

1. Measure the width of your basket and then measure the height of your basket from the bottom of the basket to the top of the rim. Multiply the height of your basket times 2 and then add this to the width of your basket.

2. Follow the diagram shown below and draw a circle the width + height X2 of your basket on a large plain piece of paper. Draw a circle around your initial circle another 1/2" around for your seam allowance and gathering of your fabric. Now, to this adjusted circle you have just drawn add another 3/4" around for the ruffle.


Monday, March 16, 2015

How To Make Our Alpacas Grazing Cut and Sew Ornaments or Dolls



The "dollies" just love their alpaca cousins and love everything and anything alpaca so they were thrilled this past weekend when they saw the alpaca ornaments I had made from my cut and sew custom fabric designs.

Each favor ornament is 3" by 4", is filled with poly-fil and hangs from a DMC floss hanger.




Cut and sew ornaments or dolls are so easy to make.  Just follow the instructions below:

Cut and Sew Finishing Instructions Per Piece

Additional Supplies Needed - Poly-fil, Sewing Thread, and Color Coordinating DMC Embroidery Floss For The Hanger For Each Piece.

1)  Cut the two pieces along the dotted lines.

2)  Place right sides together and sew 1/8” away from outer doll line leaving a small opening on the bottom for turning.

3)  Trim seam and clip edges.

4)  Turn right side out and stuff with poly-fil.

5)  Hand sew small opening closed with the sewing thread.

6)  Add a hanger to the top of the piece with 6 strands of the color coordinating DMC embroidery floss if you want to hang them as ornaments.

Alternative Cut and Sew Finishing Instructions Per Piece

Additional Supplies Needed - Poly-fil, Sewing Thread, and Color Coordinating DMC Embroidery Floss For The Hanger For Each Piece.

1)  Cut the two pieces along the dotted lines.

2)  Place wrong sides together and hand sew 1/8” away from outer doll line leaving a small opening on the bottom for stuffing.

3)  Stuff with Poly-fil.

4)  Hand sew small opening closed with the sewing thread.

5)  Trim seam and clip edges.

6)  Add a hanger to the top of the piece with 6 strands of the color coordinating DMC embroidery floss if you want to hang them as ornaments.

Alternative Method #1 For Blanket Stitch Finishing Each Piece Along The Edges

Additional Supplies Needed - Warm and Natural or Batting, and Color Coordinating DMC Embroidery Floss For Each Piece

1)  Cut the two pieces along the dotted lines.

2)  Using the front doll piece as a guide cut two pieces out of warm and natural or batting.

3)  Place the two doll pieces wrong sides together and then insert  the warm and natural or batting pieces in between the two pieces and pin along the sides to hold.

4)  Trim the edges so the pieces and warm and natural or batting  outer edges are even.

5)  Blanket stitch  1/8” - 1/4” away from outer edges with 6 strands of color coordinating DMC embroidery floss.

6)  Add a hanger to the top of the piece with 6 strands of color coordinating DMC embroidery floss if you want to hang them as ornaments.

If you don't know how to blanket stitch check out my free "Linda's How-Do-I Series? How To Blanket Stitch Free E-Book"  e-book which shows you how.

Copyright © 2004-2020 Linda Walsh Originals—Designs by Linda Walsh

I now have 265 different cut and sew doll designs including the alpaca cut and sew designs shown at the beginning of this post. Plenty of inspiration for learning how to sew. They're fast and easy and are a great way to teach kids how to sew.

If you'd like to see all my cut and sew designs please CLICK HERE for my cut and sew custom fabric collection on Spoonflower or HERE for all the cut and sew designs on my Linda Walsh Originals Fabric Designs Blog.

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

I'm An Independent Pattern Designer - Where Can I Sell My E-Patterns?

My post and list has been revised and is available here.

I often get asked by independent crafts pattern designers where they can sell their e-patterns so I thought it might be helpful to create a blog post about this.

To give you a little background on me I'm a doll maker and doll pattern designer and have had websites for over 10 years.  I created two of my own websites that I updated to Godaddy via FTP and also managed and maintained two websites that wer hosted through In A Pickle Web Design: one an instant download e-pattern, e-printable, and e-book website using MyCartToGo e-commerce software and Mals-E shopping cart and one selling handmade goods and crafts.

Now I have 1 consolidated Linda Walsh Originals Shop website at Go-Daddy that I maintain that uses a Quick Cart shopping which allows me to sell all my handmade goods and e-products on the same website.  Over the years I've created many, many, many selling and non-selling blogs.

I've been selling my doll and craft patterns and e-patterns online since 2004 and have designed over 350 e-patterns, over 30 e-books, over 20 e-printables, and several e-catalogs. To say I love instant download e-products might be an understatement. I've been in love with .pdf instant download e-products since they first came on the scene in 2004 and have tried all sorts of different venues.

Some I like, some I don't. Some have come and gone, some are free, some are very expensive, some are for specific types of patterns, some are commercial sellers websites, etc. Some are websites that do it all, some are websites that provide html code so you can sell your e-patterns on your website or your blog, some are handmade craft websites where you can list your e-patterns and then send them as an email attachment to your customer, some are websites that provide a download integration for your Etsy shoppe, some are social networking websites that allow for selling, etc. And, some are website designers and e-commerce carts that provide you with the capability of selling instant download e-patterns on your own website.

The online crafts e-pattern, e-printable, and e-book craft industry has been slowly developing over the last decade and, as far as I'm concerned, is still in it's infancy. There's plenty of room for growth and, I'm sure, plenty of room for change. Which venue is best for you is based on what you're selling, what your experience is, what your skill level is, and how much time you can devote to this. Selling e-patterns online as an independent pattern designer is a LONG SLOW process that requires nerves of steel and a lot of PATIENCE. It is not for the faint of heart or those hoping to make a quick buck. That just is not going to happen.

If you’re an artist or crafter who has created e-patterns you might be wondering how you go about selling them. Where do you store your e-patterns and how do you sell instant downloads? Whether its e-patterns or e-books you first need to create a .PDF (Portable Document Format) file which is your electronic product. Once you have created the .PDF file then with the e-patterns there are basically two ways to get the .pdf file to your customer.

1) You can send them yourself as attachments to an email once you have been notified of payment by the customer.

2) They can be sent automatically or available in one's account as "instant download e-patterns" once payment has been made.

So, what kind of online set-up do you need to accomplish this?

1) You can have your own website that has Paypal (or other payment processors) payment buttons capabilities. Once you have received notification from Paypal of payment you can send the e-pattern to your customer as an attachment to an e-mail.

2) You can have a blog that has HTML capabilities in the sidebar or posts that allow you to create Paypal (or other payment processors) payment buttons. Once you have received notification from Paypal of payment you can send the e-pattern to your customer as an attachment to an e-mail.

3) You can have your own website or blog that allows for HTML modules in the sidebar or posts whereby you can copy/paste the BUY NOW digital goods e-commerce shopping cart providers HTML code. In this instance they provide a service whereby they store your e-products on their servers and provide you with a BUY NOW (or similar) button link. When your customer clicks on that Buy Now link then the payment process would begin. Once payment has been made an email will automatically be sent to the customer with the e-pattern download link. They click on the link and follow the prompts to download your e-product. They charge you a fee for this service.

4) You can have your own website that has e-commerce instant download shopping cart capabilities that will send your customer the download link for their e-pattern via email once payment has been made to you.

5) You can have your own website that has e-commerce instant download shopping cart capabilities that will put the download link in the customer's account once payment has been made to you.

6) You can utilize a third-party website with an e-commerce shopping cart provider that has "instant download capabilities." Once payment has been made by the customer the software will automatically generate an email to the customer with the download link. Depending on their set-up you can either: a) upload your .PDF files onto their servers, b) transfer your .PDF files via FTP (file transfer protocol), or c) send them as attachments to an email to them. It all depends on how the e-pattern website is set up. The e-pattern website owners collect payment and then remit to you once they have been paid and have deducted their fee, or they may have a system in place to automatically pay you once the customer has paid. They may charge a monthly fee or charge a % of the sale price and/or both.

7) You can utilize a third-party handmade goods marketplace or community website to create a shop for you to sell your handmade goods and/or e-patterns. Once you have been notified of payment you can send the e-pattern to the customer as an attachment to an e-mail. Sometimes these third-party handmade goods marketplaces or communities have apps that can work in conjunction with your shop and automatically send the customer an email with the e-pattern download link once payment has been made.

If you're an independent crafts pattern designer and you want to sell your e-patterns online, but aren't quite ready for your own website you might want to check out the following websites:

Monday, March 09, 2015

The History of Faceless Dolls By Linda Walsh - Introduction, Parts I - Part XXIII and Conclusion - Updated February 2015

I have loved Victorian dolls since I was a little girl and can blame my grandmother for that. You see, as a young girl she gave me a Godey’s Fashion print for August 1870 that belonged to my great, great Aunt Flossie. From that moment on I was hooked. I was captivated by the beautiful dresses and wanted to create dolls wearing them.

Eventually I was able to design my own Victorian "Lady" dolls, like the one pictured on the left, who are all faceless. Now you might be wondering why they are faceless. It's because I wanted each to have its' own distinct personality.

My feeling is that faces overwhelm the dolls personality and have a greater impact on their personality. I wanted the clothing, clothes, hair, color scheme, etc. of the period to determine the personality of the doll.

As far as I am concerned "Beauty lies not only in what is seen, but what is imagined. I believe the essence of a dolls beauty should determine her personality."

You could compare this to the use of mannequins by museums. Most mannequins in museum dress & textile exhibits are either headless or have heads, but they are generally faceless. Or, they have the sculpted definition of facial features but they are not painted. The idea is to not distract from the beauty of the dress or textile piece on display. The same holds true for store window displays.

I have also been a history buff since I was a little girl and loved doing research for history projects all throughout my school years. I especially loved to research everything and anything about the Victorian Era. Their history, their etiquette, their fashion, their hopes, their desires.... In fact, sometimes I think I was born in the wrong era.

Designing handmade faceless dolls was not a novel idea as faceless dolls have been around for a long, long time. However, given my penchant for history I, of course, was curious about the history of faceless dolls. So, back in 2006 I decided to do a little research on the history of faceless dolls and wrote a research article for my Linda's Blog that I subsequently updated in 2009.

I figured that there had to be a history of handmade faceless dolls out there or, at least, some cultures and norms. Believe it or not but there wasn't a lot of information back in 2006 on the web on either the history of faceless dolls or cultures and norms that started such a tradition. There was a little more when I updated my research in 2009.

There was some information on two of the most popular and widely known faceless dolls - Amish dolls and corn husk dolls. And there was the legend surrounding Raggedy Ann and "faceless" dolls.

In doing my research, what I was pleasantly surprised with was the application of "faceless" dolls for so many current charities or organizations. More on that a little later.

I was hoping that now, in 2015, things would have changed a little and there would be more information on their history. I'm happy to report that there is a lot more now and that over the last few years there is a growing trend towards creating faceless dolls in all sorts of doll mediums - which thrills me to no end.

Part of the new trend has to do with creating eco-friendly and nature dolls and part has to do with allowing children to use their imagination more. It also has to do with comforting children facing tough medical situations. Without a face the dolls can be happy or sad, they can be laughing or crying - in essence, they can mimic the emotions of the child holding them. Putting a face on the doll defines the emotion of the doll with the child - which may or may not be comforting.

So, I decided to update my history of faceless dolls research article and include new research as well as some of the new trends. I hope you enjoy it.
























I also created a History Of Faceless Dolls .PDF.  If you would like to download my History Of Faceless Dolls .PDF please click here or on the picture below.


Copyright © 2004-2015- All Rights Reserved - Written by By Linda Walsh

I think you all know that I, personally, love faceless dolls. Victorians, primitives, colonial, prairie dolls, rag dolls, or country style dolls. It doesn't matter. I love them all.

In fact, I created a video to reflect my feelings about faceless dolls which is: "Beauty lies not only in what is seen, but what is imagined. I believe the essence of a dolls faceless beauty should determine her personality."

Please CLICK HERE or on the video below if you would like to view my "Linda's Faceless Beauties" video.


Why do I love the faceless doll so much?

Because I think by being "faceless' the doll can be anything you want him or her to be. You create the dolls personality to be exactly what you imagine it to be. Their personality, therefore, reflects your creativity and your feelings.

And, as we've seen from the above mentioned articles the application can be heartwarming, meaningful and beautiful.

In researching doing the research to update my History of Faceless Dolls article I was thrilled to see that there are hundreds of artists and crafters who are now creating various types of "faceless" dolls in all different medium. I couldn't be happier to see all these wonderful new applications for faceless dolls. I'm hoping you all will agree.

For more information on all my free e-patterns, e-printables and e-books please CLICK HERE.

Please respect My Terms of Use:  All patterns, e-patterns, printables, e-printables, e-books, graphics, tutorials, how-to's, articles and other e-products © 2004-2020 Linda Walsh Originals-Designs by Linda Walsh. All rights reserved. Commercial selling or reselling by any means prohibited without the written consent of Linda Walsh.

Patterns, e-patterns, printables, e-printables, e-books, graphics, tutorials, how-to's, articles and other e-products are for personal use only. You may not modify, photocopy, download, upload, post, transmit, display, perform, publish, license, reprint, create derivative works from, mass duplicate, re-sell, digitize, and reproduce in any other form (print, digital or electric) or commercially apply, embed, share, Email, or redistribution in any other means. Use of any of the above is prohibited without the written permission of Linda Walsh.

However, you may link to my website(s)/blog(s) and the individual page(s)/blog post(s) (including 1 picture) but do not copy, reprint or duplicate my website(s)/blog(s) or individual page(s)/post(s ) without my permission.

Items made from Linda Walsh Originals E-Patterns are intended for personal use for fun or small scale personal and business profit as long as you credit us with the design. Large scale commercial use (i.e. mass production) of items made from Linda Walsh Originals E-Patterns are by permission only.

Please see my Terms and Conditions for additional information.

Copyright © 2004 - 2020 - All Rights Reserved - Written By Linda Walsh of Linda Walsh Originals and Linda's Blog. Linda is a doll maker and doll pattern designer.

It's Not That Much Longer Until Artful Gathering 2015


It's always delightful when you get an email that brings an immediate smile to your face, takes you a long time to read, and is saved to be read again.

Such was the case with the email from Zinnia Galliher with a link to the Artful Gathering 2015 Workshop Catalog.

This will be my 4th year taking online classes at Artful Gathering and I can hardy wait. I have loved each and every class I've taken there as the instructors are fantastic and the classes are always delightful. I've had a blast in each class learning something new and, best of all, making wonderful new friends.

Last year there were so many fabulous classes to choose from it was hard to decide. This year, based on the workshop catalog in my email, it will be nearly impossible to choose.  There are just SO MANY wonderful online classes that I want to take.

Truth be told, I want to take them all, but that is definitiely not possible. So, choose I must - but, oh, how difficult that will be.

So far I have my eye on the following:

Mary Jane Chadbourne - Session 2 - Tiny Topia & The Magic of Little Things
Rosemary Frew - Session 1 - Baby Carrot - Session 2 - Petit LaPin
Hally Levesque - Session 1- Bonnets & Bows: A Regency Doll Project
Joanna Grant - Session 2 - Mixed Media FX: The Hottest Techniques For The Coolest Effects
Judy Porter - Session 2 - Out On A Whim Art Doll
Susan Myers - Session 2 - Boite A Couture
David H. Everett - Session 1 - Making A Santa Advent Calendar
Lyn Belisle - Session 1 - The Magic Of Spirit Dolls

Session 1 runs from June 6 to July 17 and Session 2 runs from July 16 to August 16,  

Several months ago Zinnia also created a 2014 Artful Gathering yearbook of last years online retreat. It was filled with event highlights and wonderful pictures of student creations. 


I'm on the back cover (Page 56) with a page filled with pictures of the creations I have made over the last 3 years. 


If you've always wanted to take an online art and/or craft class you won't be disappointed in any of the Artful Gathering classes.

Hope to see you there.


Sunday, March 08, 2015

The History Of Faceless Dolls - Updated February 2015 - Part XXIII - Faceless Dolls For Charity and Conclusion


In doing my research on faceless dolls I was delighted to run across some websites concerning the application of "faceless" dolls in charity today and why they were chosen or made "faceless."

Back in 2006 one of those articles was about "faceless" dolls of Gloria Larocque. She has created 100 or more "faceless" dolls based upon the Iroquois legend that warns young girls about the dangers of vanity.

However, according to the article her purpose is different. Her dolls represent Canada's murdered aboriginal women, a group made faceless not by vanity but by neglect. Her project has helped draw attention to the plight of the murdered aboriginal women.

According to Gloria:"The dolls will act as a centre-piece for educating children about traditional Aboriginal culture, maintaining cultural integrity through a contemporary setting. As a teaching tool kit, the idea will be to plant seeds of survival skills concepts such as choice, strength, education, cultural connection and knowledge of self.

The kit will contain a doll in the same fashion as an Aboriginal Angel Doll, and will be presented as an “elder”. The doll will be known as Kookum RETA (grandmother rejuvenate, educate, traditional, acceptance) of the Aboriginal people from Turtle Island. The power of the elder teaching the young is a traditional aboriginal teaching method."


In 2010 the Native Women's Association of Canada (NWAC) contacted Gloria Larocque to explore the possibility of creating a similar project as hers that, "would carry forward the visual representation of strong and beautiful Aboriginal women who have become ‘faceless’ victims of crime. This collaboration resulted in NWAC’s Faceless Doll Project. The dolls created through this new project will be used to create a traveling art exhibit in memory of the more than 600 missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls in Canada. NWAC’s Faceless Doll Project was launched in March 2012 and Community Engagement Workshops were held across the country (funded by the Status of Women Canada). Community members were invited to come and hear the Faceless Doll story and create their very own doll for inclusion in this
commemorative art project. All workshop materials were provided."

The NWAC created a Building On The Legacy Of The NWAC Faceless Doll Project: Create Your Own Faceless Dolls .PDF concerning this initiative and containing information for workshops for groups to create faceless paper dolls in tribute and solidarity of the 600 missing and murdered Aboriginal women. If you would like to see and read the Building On The Legacy Of The NWAC Faceless Doll Project: Create Your Own Faceless Dolls  .PDF please click here.

There was also an article by Brenda Tobias on the Cornell University website concerning Hurricane Katrina and something the alumni did to help the children affected by Hurricane Katrina. A group of 100 alumni got together to sew "faceless" dolls for the children. Doll decorating kits and coloring books were assembled and sent to the children to comfort them.

The History Of Faceless Dolls - Updated February 2015 - Part XXII- A Very Famous Faceless Doll


Raggedy Ann meets Raggedy Andy for the first time; illustrated by Johnny Gruelle

As far as Raggedy Ann is concerned, one of the legends surrounding her creation is that a little girl was rummaging around her Grandmother's attic and finds a faceless, battered old doll. She brings the doll into her fathers art studio and tells him all about finding it in the attic. He looks at his daughter and the faceless doll and decides to draw a whimsical face on it and then tells her to see if her Grandmother would sew two button eyes on. And so Raggedy Ann was born.

Saturday, March 07, 2015

The History Of Faceless Dolls - Updated February 2015 - Part XXI - Books To Help You Create Your Own Faceless Dolls

One of the greatest things about creating art dolls is they can be made out of any media and be an expression of whatever the artist or maker wishes to convey. Sometimes the art doll is funky, wild, out of this world, happy, sad, or just plain "out there!"

When making art dolls nothing is more fun than mixed media art dolls. There are no boundaries and no limits where they are concerned - including "faceless" mixed media art dolls.

Sarah Lawrence is a contemporary textile artist who exhibits her creations all over the world and has written several books. One of her books, Art Dolls - 20 To Make contains the directions for making 20 of her art dolls, 7 of which are "faceless" and would be fun to make.

The 7 faceless dolls include: Jumping Jack who is a wooden bead doll, Timelines which is a textile figure doll, Statuesque and Painted Lady which are four-sided paper dolls, Angelica and Angel Choir who are wooden doll peg painted angels, Wired  Woman which is a bended wire doll, Heart Of Glass which is the beaded doll shown in the picture to the left, Man Of Dreams and Woman of Soul which are four-sided paper dolls, and Button Up which is a wood bead and button doll. Templates, if required, are included in the book but would need to be re-sized as they are shown at 67% of their size.

If you would like to see pictures of some of these dolls please click here for the Amazon.com page and then click on the book image to look inside.

You can also see pictures of Jumping Jack, Timelines, Statuesque - Painted Lady, Angelica - Angel Choir, and Heart Of Glass here.

I love angels and all the beauty, goodness, and protection they represent and especially love, guardian angels whose job it is to protect you, groups of people, even the world.

For artists and crafters angels take all sorts of shapes and sizes and can be made out of just about any medium.  That's why you find folk art angels, primitive angels, mixed media angels, Victorian angels, paper angels, woodcraft angels. glass angels, fabric angels, beaded angels, metal angels and so much more.  Angels may have faces or even be faceless - which, of course, I love.

In doing my research for this article I found a wonderful Making Angels -Ornaments, and Dolls By Hand - Step-by-Step Instructions for 47 projects by Holly Harrison.

Out of the 47 angel projects in this book 19 are faceless.  There's Kitchen Spice which is a cinnamon and nutmeg angel, Dieter's Delight which is a cooper metal angel, Sugar Shell Angel which is a spoon and cooper angel, Domestic Bliss Angel which is a wire and cloth angel, Rose Angel which is a beautiful corn husk angel, Art Deco Garden Angel which is a embossable copper sheet angel, and Maia - Springtime Angel which is a painted paper angel.

There's Crystal - Dewdrop Angel which is a wood and silver tin angel, Summer Angel which is a beach glass and crushed shells angel, Fall Harvest Angel which is a moss covered angel, Angel In Brown which is a raffia angel, Earth Angel which is a driftwood and branch angel, Winter Solstice Angel which is a copper wire mesh angel, Marina - Dancing Angel which is a seashell and wire angel, and Ballerina Angel which is an adorable cloth angel.

There's the Real Woman Angels which are cloth angels that I absolutely love, Happiness Angel which is a wire angel, Blue Angel which is a glass angel, and Valentine Angel which is a paper angel.

If you would like to see pictures of the Kitchen Spice, Dieter's Delight, Sugar Shelf Angel, and Domestic Bliss Angel please click here.

Friday, March 06, 2015

The History Of Faceless Dolls - Updated February 2015 - Part XX - Other Faceless Doll Art


Karen Meacham, is a prekindergarten teacher at an independent school who, according to her, " is someone who loves creating natural toys and loves children." She makes the most adorable faceless (Waldorf inspired) wood carved art dolls (like the doll shown in the picture to the bottom right), carved wooden peg dolls (like the doll shown in the pictures below), and needle felted art dolls (like the Geisha doll shown in the picture to the right).

According to the Karen Meacham Designs Faceless Soft-Felted Toys article by Lynda Heines in the Evansville Courier & Press from Oct. 2, 2011, " Karen Meacham designs her faceless soft-felted toys to encourage children to use their imaginations."

"Inspired by the Waldorf approach to education, which encourages children to use their imagination, Meacham's creations allow children to act out their own scenarios and decide for themselves the emotions of the dolls. And they are made of all natural materials."

Her Little Acorns Blog by Karen Meacham blog is filled with posts about her life, her family, her natural classroom and being a teacher, and includes some tutorials showing how she made some of her dolls.

She has a couple charming posts and/or tutorials on her blog concerning the needle felted playscape she made and all the wooden peg people she carved and painted for this.

For her playscape according to Karen, "My original idea was to create a little scene in which small figures could interact in a variety of ways and in a variety of places. I also wanted to create a "location" to which children could add their own personal touches such as housewares, furniture, animals, gardening tools or different garden crops, or a fishing rod."

If you would like to see and read her Felted Playscape: Part I tutorial and post please click here.

Tutorial on Carving Peg People: Mother Earth and her Root Children (Felted Playscape: Part II) is a charming post and tutorial about carving the Mother Earth and her children that she wanted for her playscape.

According to Karen, "I am not a stranger to peg people.  I love using them in the classroom.  We use them for a "first day of school" project. The children paint and decorate one to represent themselves. They are then strung on a string and hung on hooks outside each center area......"

"But to give peg people a little extra personality, a little extra zing if you will, they might need a wee bit more than paint.  Shaping peg people (as I have discovered after creating 10 of them) gives them a little more personality.  Children have marvelous imaginations and certainly do not require the level of detail I have given my creations, but I enjoy making them.  Plus in the past, our students did seem to especially enjoy playing with toys they knew I had created with our class in mind."

The History Of Faceless Dolls - Updated February 2015 - Part XVIIII - The Ruth E. Aten World Doll Collection: Americas


The Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology at Indiana University is, according to their website, " a leading center for the worldwide study of vernacular arts, and of the historical, cultural and social contexts in which these arts are embedded. The home to two closely aligned disciplines with a deep shared history at IU, the department has a distinguished history and a bright future in the areas of research, teaching, public outreach and community service."

One of the items in their collection is The Ruth E. Aten World Doll Collection: Americas.  It is a collection of dolls from Latin America, the Carribean, Central America, North America and South America.

Most of the dolls in her collection have faces, but there were several that didn't. It is an incedible collection to see.  If you would like to view The Ruth E. Aten World Doll Collection: Americas collection pleaser click here.

Here's a few of the faceless dolls from her doll collection with some of the information on each doll:

NAmer41. U.S.A. Colonial Clothespin Doll

6” Small doll made of clothespins and dressed in colonial attire with a calico print dress, bonnet and white rickrack trim apron.

Making dolls out of clothespins was a popular early form of doll making.

Given by Ruth Aten. 1999

NAmer40. Eagle, Alaska, U.S.A.. Alaskan Mother and Baby 

8” Handmade stuffed doll of mother and baby, flowered cotton outfit with fur trim, sculptured head with beaded eyes.

Tag: “This symbol is your guarantee that this is a genuine article, made in Alaska, handcrafted by an Alaska resident artist or craftsman.

Doll was made by Sharon Hamilton, a resident of Eagle, Alaska. Eagle is a small isolated village in Alaska where they survive the winters by growing and gathering food from the land.

As a resident said, “Here we prefer eating bears that lived in the woods and ate berries to bears that ate fish from a stream or river. Bears that live on berries are sweeter and not fishy tasting; they’re pre-marinated.”

Purchased by Ruth Aten in Eagle, Alaska. 2005

Thursday, March 05, 2015

The History Of Faceless Dolls - Updated February 2015 - Part XVIII - Faceless Dolls From Carole's World Costume Doll Collection


I have been a collector of dolls my entire life and love looking at other doll collections. In updating my faceless doll article I found several websites with information on and pictures of the dolls in their world collections.

The largest collection of world dolls I found was Carole's from World Costume Doll. She has been collecting dolls since 1957 and has information on and pictures of the 1900 dolls in her collection. The dolls are all part of Carole's private collection and not for sale.

Most of the dolls in her collection have faces, but there were several that didn't. It is an incredible collection to see.  If you would like to view her World Costume Doll collection please click here.

Here's a few of the faceless dolls from her world doll collection with some of the information on each doll:

Zulu Matron Doll

Continent: Africa
Region: Southern Africa
Country: South Africa
Year: C.1980
Type: Tribal
Material: Cardboard
Id: Africa - South Africa - 001

If you would like to read more about what Carole had to say about this doll please click here.

BOTSWANA - Tribal doll

Continent: Africa
Region: Southern Africa
Country: Botswana
Year: C.1960
Type: Tribal
Material: Rag and cloth
Id: Africa - Botswana - 002

If you would like to read more about what Carole had to say about this doll please click here.

The History Of Faceless Dolls - Updated February 2015 - Part XVII - Faceless Dolls of Francoise Bosteels


In doing my research for faceless dolls I was thrilled to find Francoise Bosteels, Iconic Dolls, Sacred Art blog with her amazing faceless art dolls of India, like those shown in the pictures to the left and right.

According to her blog she was trained as a nurse and joined the Sisters of the Divine Savior in France. She went to India in 1974 to work with the village people in the South Tamil Nadu villages, which is where her inspiration for her beautiful faceless dolls developed.

Her faceless dolls are just astonishing.  In looking at them you can feel the beauty of the doll and the complex life of the village people and their stories that she is trying to convey.

Her blog contains a "Process" page which describes and shows how she creates her art dolls and how, in particular, she created the art doll shown in the picture on the left.

According to her "Process" page, "The materials I use are ordinary: a variety of colourful cloth called feutre; raphia (strong paper ribbons); pipe-cleaners; cotton balls for heads; wool; thread and discarded bobbins; banana and coconut fibre; palm leaves; bamboo; pieces of wood; small boxes and similar throw-away items. Gold and silver threads make a variety of jewellery. Sometimes I make use of small ready-made toys or art pieces such as a sewing machine or a harp. Tiny props used to create an environment have a story on their own. Thread and gum hold the figure together."

Wednesday, March 04, 2015

The History Of Faceless Dolls - Updated February 2015 - Part XVI - Mixed Media Faceless Dolls


Faceless dolls have become very popular in mixed media creations over the last dew years.  Part of the reason is that your creation can be made out of just about anything. It can also be watercolor art, painted canvas art, collage and decoupage art, rubber stamped or stenciled art and conveying whatever it is you wish to convey.  It can also empower individuals with finding an inner voice, developing confidence, and expressing who they are individually.

Christy Tomlinson is a self-taught very talented mixed media artist, who as she says, "who isn't afraid to get my hands messy and let my heart be open" and the creator of the "She Art workshops." She has traveled all over the world teaching her mixed media art workshops and teaching online.

In her workshop she teaches how to create her mixed media "she art" canvas and collage faceless girls.

Here is what Christy said about why her girls are faceless, "Week 3 we will finish off by going even more in depth to creating facial details. Not just a "blank" face anymore. SO many times people ask my why I don't put faces on my girls. Is it because I don't know how to or I don't like to or what? And the answer is always the same."

"The reason I don't often times.. or MOST times put faces on my girls is because when there is no face, the observer of the art is left to determine the mood, the soul of the girl. Sometimes just by adding even shading in certain places or adding details down her neck, or in her hair..tell more about her, than a set of eyes do.. staring at you from the canvas."

"So I usually leave the girls faceless, so that whoever is enjoying her, can decide for themselves what she is trying to say.. the story she has to tell. HOWEVER.. there are times that I think there is a definite story to be told."