Thursday, March 31, 2016

Early Grodnertal Tuck Comb Wooden Peddler Dolls and Other Grodnertal Peddler Dolls


Image Courtesy of Theriaults.com 

It seems like every time I'm doing research for one thing I find so many other things that pique my curiosity. Such was the case with my research on the "The Sweet Simplicity of Tuck Comb Wooden Dolls" I posted about earlier. I discovered the "Early Grodnertal Tuck Comb Wooden Peddler Dolls" and absolutely had to know more.

The "Early Grodnertal Wooden Doll As Doll And Notions Peddler Lady" doll shown above is from Theriaults.com website is a doll after my own heart. Not only do I absolutely love her large bonnet, but she's selling sewing notions and dolls. She has five tiny dolls on her table including two mini Grodnertal woodens. Perhaps that was me in another life?

According to her description :7" Condition: generally excellent,original finish perfectly preserved. Comments: Grodnertal doll,circa 1850,presented for the English market as a peddler lady offering sewing notions and dolls. On her table are arranged a myriad of tiny laces,ribbons and buttons, sewing tools such as tiny scissors, various papers with lettered names "Robert","Margaret" and "John", several tiny doll costumes, and five tiny dolls including two mini Grodnertal woodens. Realized Price: $4,100

According to The Ultimate Doll Book by Caroline Goodfellow peddler dolls were popular from 1820 - 1920.  They were a conversation piece in fashionable 19th century English drawing rooms and held a prominent place on the fireplace mantels. During this period there was a fascination with itinerant traders who travelled all over Europe, but peddler dolls were a "peculiarly English phenomenon." Most of the dolls were made in Germany and dressed in England with heads of wood, composition, apples and wax. The bodies were made of wood, composition, or stuffed cloth.

Grodnertal Wooden Costume Dolls


Image Courtesy of Theriaults.com 

If you follow my Victorian Dolls, Victorian Traditions, The Victorian Era and Me Blog you know that I just LOVE the Victorian Era, love history, love to do research, and love fashion doll collections. Several years ago I ran across the Metropolitan Museum of Art website and fell in love with their collections, the ability to see everything they have in their collections, and the ability to set-up my own "My Met" space to bookmark items at the MET that I love.  So, I spent an afternoon "Moseying At The MET!" and wrote about it HERE.

Well, while researching the "Penny Wooden and Peg Wooden Dolls" I came across a series of beautiful Grodnertal Wooden Costume Dolls depicting the 11th - 16th century and just had to show them to you.  All of the dolls are from the Theriault's website.

I think they're all absolutely beautiful and love all their costumes.  As you would except they are all very pricey - especially the doll depicting the 16th century costume.

Monday, March 28, 2016

Early American Wooden Dolls By Joel Ellis From 1873


While I was doing research  on the "The History of Faceless Dolls" I read several articles about antique wooden dolls and fell in love with Penny Wooden Dolls so much so that I ended up writing a blog post entitled, "I'm In Love With Penny Wooden or Peg Wooden Dolls."

While doing that research I also ran across the wooden dolls created by Joel Ellis in 1873 which piqued my curiosity as he was from Vermont and only made his dolls for one year. Given I'm a die hard New Englander and curious as to why he only made them for one year I had to find out more.

Not only did I love his wooden dolls, what interested me was the workmanship on his dolls clothes, which was exceptional, unlike the cheap clothes on manufactured dolls today.

The doll pictured above is for sale on the Liveauctioneers.com website - 9: Rare 19th Century Wooden Head Doll, Joel Ellis.  According to their website this doll is attributed to Joel Ellis with metal hands, legs & feet and stands 15" tall.

According to their website, "Joel Ellis created a doll whose face is indeed a portrait of the traditional New England model of graceful simplicity – a quiet composed and simple beauty that now transports us to a long ago time. Yet we may forget the technological challenges and triumphs so benignly represented in this little rendition of humanity."

It turns out that Joel was an inventive genius who patented 13 different articles, one of which was for a wooden doll. He is credited as being the creator of the first commercial doll for America which he manufactured through his company, the Co-operative Manufacturing Company, on the premises of the Vermont Novelty Goods Company.

He filed his patent for a wooden doll of rock maple with mortise and tenon joints, and pewter or iron hands and feet on February 21, 1873 and it was granted on May 20, 1873.

According to the article from the Old and Sold Antiques Marketplace, "In 1873 Ellis took out a patent for a wooden doll of rock maple with mortise and tenon joints, and pewter or iron hands and feet. Heads were of blocks of wood taken from the end of the grain and rounded, except for one pointed side which allowed for the nose. Each block was put into a steel mold and shaped under hydraulic pressure. When it came out of the press, holes were drilled to fit a large tenon that had been made on the end of the body. The head, which was stationary, was glued to the body by means of this large tenon. The doll came in twelve, fifteen, and eighteen-inch heights. The most plentiful is the twelve inch, the least, the eighteen inch."

Sunday, March 27, 2016

Ester Loves The Morning - 1858 Morning Dress - Victorian Lady Doll



"Ester Loves The Morning", "Mehitable", "Sweet, Sweet Julianna", and "Prudence On A Walk" have been friends since they were all in diapers. In fact they've always been the BEST of friends. They love each other, protect each other, and are fiercely devoted to each other. So much so that it sometimes gets in the way of their relationships with their boyfriends.

Without fail, every day they get together for their afternoon tea and crumpets. Everything and anything is fair game in their discussions. They might be talking about the latest Godey fashions plate pages, they're newest outfit, the Queen's annual ball, their families, their boyfriends, their engagements, etc. Nothing is off limits. That is, nothing within the reasonable limits of proper Victorian discussion etiquette. Their afternoon teas are held on a rotating basis with each friend hosting the afternoon tea every fourth day. Today, they will all be having tea in Mehitable's parlor.

"Ester Loves The Morning" is a 14" Victorian square bottomed cloth bodied doll with a gathered waistline, porcelain head, and porcelain arms. She is wearing an 1858 Morning Dress. Esther has two layers of lace trim along the bottom of her body. Her slip is finished along the bottom hem edge with flat lace trim and is gathered at the waist. A full length lace overslip has been added and is also gathered at the waist.

Her 1858 Morning Dress is very dainty looking and has a lace trimmed and gathered front insert with 4 levels of gathered lace trim. Flat lace trim surrounded by gathered lace trim is sewn to the front center of the bodice and lace trim adorns the sleeve hem edge. Her Victorian dress has a multi-layered lace trimmed overskirt and both the overskirt and dress skirt with the dainty front insert are gathered at the waist. Gathered lace trim also adorns the waistline of her dress bodice and dress skirt and adorns the bottom hem edge of her dress skirt. Her dress is gathered at the neck edge and adorned with lace trim. Ester's outfit includes a lined and lace trimmed shawl with arm loops. Her dainty bonnet is adorned with multiple layers of lace trim and ribbon bows and is gathered along the bun line of her hair.

Ester just loves her 1858 Morning Dress and loves to go out walking in the morning when she is wearing it. She knows that it is exquisitely detailed and lace trimmed and draws a lot of attention which Esther doesn't mind at all. She just loves all the flattery.

Note: The porcelain head and hands that are pictured are from Midwest Design Imports.

Designer - Linda Walsh of Linda Walsh Originals

Saturday, March 26, 2016

Isolda - Just Let Her Stroll In The Park! - Victorian Girl Doll



"Isolda" loves to stroll in the park. It doesn't matter if it's sunny, rainy, cold, or warm. Isolda just loves being outside and loves walking, strolling, chatting with friends she meets, and just plain musing.

"Isolda" is an 11" Victorian cloth bodied doll with a gathered waistline, cloth legs with cross laced and painted black boots, porcelain head, and porcelain arms. She is wearing an 1863 Street Dress.  Isolda is wearing bloomers with lace trim that are gathered at the waist. Her slip is lace trimmed and gathered at the waist as well.

Her 1863 Street Dress has oversleeves. The sleeves have two layers of lace trim along the sleeve hem edge and are gathered at the shoulders. The oversleeves have lace trim along the edge and are also gathered at the shoulders. Her Victorian dress is gathered at the waist and lace trimmed at the waist as well. Her dress has 1 layer of gathered lace trim and one layer of wide gathered satin ribbon trim along the bottom hem edge. The neck edge of her dress is gathered and lace trimmed. Isolda has a delicate old handkerchief wrapped around her shoulders for a shawl that is tied in a knot in the front.

"Isolda" can spend all day just walking, strolling, talking, chatting, pondering and musing in the park. She never gets bored and never gets tired of it. Just let her stroll, and stroll, and stroll.

Note: The porcelain head and hands that are pictured are from Midwest Design Imports.

Designer - Linda Walsh of Linda Walsh Originals

Friday, March 25, 2016

Prudence On A Walk With Her 1858 Red Walking Dress - Victorian Lady Doll




"Prudence On A Walk", "Mehitable", "Sweet, Sweet Julianna", and "Ester Loves The Morning" have been friends since they were all in diapers. In fact they've always been the BEST of friends. They love each other, protect each other, and are fiercely devoted to each other. So much so that it sometimes gets in the way of their relationships with their boyfriends.

Without fail, every day they get together for their afternoon tea and crumpets. Everything and anything is fair game in their discussions. They might be talking about the latest Godey fashions plate pages, they're newest outfit, the Queen's annual ball, their families, their boyfriends, their engagements, etc. Nothing is off limits. That is, nothing within the reasonable limits of proper Victorian discussion etiquette. Their afternoon teas are held on a rotating basis with each friend hosting the afternoon tea every fourth day. Today, they will all be having tea in Mehitable's parlor.

"Prudence On A Walk" is a 13" Victorian square bottomed cloth bodied doll with a gathered waistline, porcelain head, and porcelain arms. She is wearing an 1858 Walking Dress. Prudence has two layers of lace trim along the bottom of her body. Her slip has 2 layers of lace trim along the bottom hem edge and is gathered at the waist.

Her 1858 Walking Dress is a two-tone Victorian dress with two layers of fancy lace trimmed overskirts. The sleeves are lace trimmed and gathered at the shoulders and wrists. Her Victorian dress is gathered at the waist and has a two separate layers of lace trimmed overskirts which are also gathered at the waist. Her dress is gathered along the neck edge which is adorned with lace trim. A single layer of gathered lace trim runs along the bottom hem edge.

Prudence's outfit includes a lined and lace trimmed shawl that is wrapped around her shoulders with armhole loops. Her matching and coordinated lined bonnet has a wide brim and is tied in a knot under her chin.

Prudence can hardly wait for the afternoon tea to show her best friends her new red walking outfit. She just loves it and feels like the belle of the ball when she's wearing it and hopes that her friends will love it as much as she does.

Note: The porcelain head and hands that are pictured are from Midwest Design Imports.

Designer - Linda Walsh of Linda Walsh Originals

Thursday, March 24, 2016

Lettice Would Really Like To Meet Some New People - Victorian Girl Doll



"Lettice" just moved to London and decided that it was such a nice day that she would take a stroll in the park. After all, she had on her newest street ensemble and would surely make a good impression on everyone she encountered in the park.

"Lettice" is an 11" Victorian cloth bodied doll with a gathered waistline, cloth legs with cross laced painted black boots, porcelain head, and porcelain arms. She is wearing an 1858 Walking Dress. Lettice's bloomers are lace trimmed and gathered at the waist. Her slip is lace trimmed and also gathered at the waist. Her 1858 Street Dress is really an ensemble with a matching dress, lined two level jacket, matching bonnet, and matching purse. Lettice's dress is gathered at the waist and the sleeves are gathered at the shoulders and wrist. Two layers of lace trim adorn the bottom hem edge and her gathered neck edge. Her coordinating jacket is lined with 3/4 sleeves that are gathered at the shoulders. Her jacket has a lined upper section and lined and gathered lower section and is top stitched along all the edges. It is fastened in the middle of the front with a ribbon bow.

She has a full head of curly brown doll hair. Her bonnet is matching, lined, and gathered and is tied under the left side of her chin in a bow. Her matching shoulder strap purse is gathered and decorated with ribbon trim and is draped over her right shoulder.

Lettice is anxious to meet new people and equally anxious to make a good first impression. She'd love to be invited to join any one of the numerous afternoon tea societies and is hoping that maybe today will be the day she meets a new friend.

Note: The porcelain head and hands that are pictured are from Midwest Design Imports.

Designer - Linda Walsh Originals

Linda's Book Reviews - 15th and 16th Bluebook Dolls & Values

   

I'll bet that doll collectors who scour flea markets and yard sales for that rare doll find always take something with them. Want to bet? Want to know what that is?

Well, it would be the Blue Book Dolls and Values, 15th Edition book or, now, Jan Foulke's Guide to Dolls: A Definitive Identification & Price Guide book. Why would I bet that they all take their copies whenever they go hunting for dolls? Because if you are a doll collector, especially a collector of rare and vintage dolls, and want to know what a doll is worth you need the "Blue Book."

The "15Th (or 16Th) Blue Book - Dolls & Values" is written by Jan Foulke with photographs by Howard Foulke.

I would dare say that the doll collector's "blue book" is the most trusted price guide to all types of dolls around. The book I have is the 15Th edition and there is now a new 16Th edition.

If you are into dolls and collecting old, vintage, or even new dolls the "Blue Book" will help you identify and learn about your dolls or dolls you are thinking of buying. It can help you appraise the dolls you already have in your collection as well as help you to determine whether or not a doll you are considering buying is fairly priced.

It also has useful information for the doll collecting enthusiast as to investing in dolls, marks to look for, quality, condition, body, clothing, total originality, age, size, availability, popularity, desirability, uniqueness, and visual appearance. It also has tips for selling a doll.

The "Blue Book" is organized into two alphabetical sections: Antique & Vintage Dolls, and Modern & Collectible Dolls. In each section the dolls are listed alphabetically by doll maker, by material, and sometimes by trade name.

The values shown in the "Blue Book" are retail prices for clean dolls in excellent overall condition. For the doll collecting enthusiast this book is an indispensable tool especially if you're walking around that flea market or scouring yard sales for that "rare" doll find.

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Laura, Lady In Waiting! and Sweet Dreamy Dana, Victorian In Her Soul! - Victorian Candlestick Dolls




I tend to like unconventional dolls and dolls that can stand by themselves. As a result, I'm always looking for different ways to make Victorian dolls and decided that I would like to make a Victorian equivalent of a primitive "make-do!" But, instead of using something primitive like a rusty spring I wanted to use a wooden candlestick and a half porcelain Victorian doll. Thus, my Victorian candlestick dolls were born.

"Laura, Lady In Waiting" and "Sweet Dreamy Dana, Victorian In Her Soul!" are identical twin sisters and two of my new Victorian Candlestick Dolls. They both LOVE the Victorian era and love Victorian fashions, and love to play tricks on their family and each others boyfriends. They are so identical it is hard to tell them apart facially. However, Laura is taller than the Dana and Laura tends to like splashy colors while Dana favors blues.

Plus, Dana is a bit on the shy side and tends to favor walks in the park, reading a good book, and sewing while Laura prefers Victorian balls, splashy appearance, and societal teas. Facially they are very alike. In their personalities they couldn't be more different.




"Laura, Lady In Waiting" is a 16" Victorian candlestick doll with a wood candlestick frame and base and a porcelain head with 1/2 porcelain upper body. Eyelet lace trim is wrapped around the top of the wood candlestick and lower part of the 1/2 porcelain body. Laura is wearing an eyelet lace slip that is gathered at the waist. Her multi-colored and 6 sectional Victorian dress is gathered at the waist and has lace trim along her neckline as well as lace ribbon bow decorations. Her sleeves are gathered at the shoulders and wrists and there is a gathered lace trim waistband wrapped tightly around her waist and secured in the back. There are two layers of ribbon and gathered lace trim along the bottom hem edge.

Laura has a multi-layered gathered ribbon and lace trim shawl wrapped around her shoulders and arms and a gathered ribbon and lace trim cap along the top of her head. Small ribbon bows adorn her cap in the back.

"Laura, Lady In Waiting" is waiting to see if she's going to be invited to the Queens Annual Spring Ball. She definitely wants to go and already has a new multi-colored dress picked out that she figures will make her the belle of the ball. So, she's waiting - waiting and waiting for her invitation to arrive.

Note: The 7" porcelain head and 1/2 upper body is from Midwest Design Imports.

Designer - Linda Walsh of Linda Walsh Originals


"Sweet Dreamy Dana, Victorian In Her Soul!" is a 15" Victorian candlestick doll with a wood candlestick frame and base and a porcelain head with 1/2 porcelain upper body. Eyelet lace trim is wrapped around the top of the wood candlestick and lower part of the 1/2 porcelain body. Dana is wearing an eyelet lace slip that is gathered at the waist. Her beautiful Victorian blue colored dress is gathered at the waist and has two layers of gathered lace trim and one layer of straight ribbon trim along the bottom hem edge. The sleeves are puffy and gathered at the shoulders and wrists. Lace trim adorns her neckline.

Her lace trimmed lace shawl is made from an old lace handkerchief and is wrapped around her shoulders and tied in a knot in the front. Dana's fancy gathered and lace trimmed and lined bonnet has two tiers of lace trim and flat ribbon trim wrapped around the lower band. It sits beautifully on the top of her head.

"Sweet Dreamy Dana, Victorian In Her Soul!" doesn't care if she isn't invited to the Queen's Annual Spring Ball. She'd much rather read a romance novel or take a leisurely stroll in the park.

Note: The 7" porcelain head and 1/2 upper body is from Midwest Design Imports.

Designer - Linda Walsh Of Linda Walsh Originals

Tuesday, March 22, 2016

Mehitable Is Getting Ready For The Afternoon Tea - Victorian Lady Doll



"Mehitable", "Sweet, Sweet Julianna", "Ester Loves The Morning" and "Prudence On A Walk" have been friends since they were all in diapers. In fact they've always been the BEST of friends. They love each other, protect each other, and are fiercely devoted to each other. So much so that it sometimes gets in the way of their relationships with their boyfriends.

Without fail, every day they get together for their afternoon tea and crumpets. Everything and anything is fair game in their discussions. They might be talking about the latest Godey fashions plate pages, they're newest outfit, the Queen's annual ball, their families, their boyfriends, their engagements, etc. Nothing is off limits. That is, nothing within the reasonable limits of proper Victorian discussion etiquette. Their afternoon teas are held on a rotating basis with each friend hosting the afternoon tea every fourth day. Today, they will all be having tea in Mehitable's parlor.

"Mehitable" is a 13" Victorian square bottomed cloth bodied doll with a gathered waistline, porcelain head, and porcelain arms. She is wearing an 1858 Walking Dress. Mehitable has two layers of lace trim along the bottom of her body. Her slip is lace trimmed and gathered at the waist.

Her 1858 Walking Dress has oversleeves and an overskirt. The sleeves are lace trimmed and gathered at the shoulders and wrists. The oversleeves have two layers of lace trim along the edge and are also gathered at the shoulders. Her Victorian dress is gathered at the waist and has a 2 layer lace trimmed overskirt which is also gathered at the waist. Scalloped finished lace trim surrounds her neck edge. A single layer of gathered lace trim runs along the bottom hem edge and scalloped lace trim. Mehitable's outfit includes a lined and lace trimmed shawl that is wrapped around her shoulders and secured in the front with a silk floral. There is a row of finished bridal lace trim decorating the bun in her hair and a ribbon bow in the back of her bun. She is carrying a bouquet of miniature ceramic Lilly's with ribbon streamers.

Mehitable just received the latest fashion plate page from Godey's and is anxious to show her best friends the latest in Paris fashion at this afternoons tea. She has her eye on a particular ensemble and wants to get her friends opinion on it before she orders it. But, right now she is busy preparing for her afternoon tea and needs to get ready. So much to do - so little time.

Note: The porcelain head and hands that are pictured are from Midwest Design Imports.

Designer - Linda Walsh of Linda Walsh Originals

Monday, March 21, 2016

Sweet, Sweet Julianna! Is Wearing Her 1863 Walking Dress - Victorian Lady Doll



"Sweet, Sweet Julianna", "Mehitable" "Ester Loves The Morning" and "Prudence On A Walk" have been friends since they were all in diapers. In fact they've always been the BEST of friends. They love each other, protect each other, and are fiercely devoted to each other. So much so that it sometimes gets in the way of their relationships with their boyfriends.

Without fail, every day they get together for their afternoon tea and crumpets. Everything and anything is fair game in their discussions. They might be talking about the latest Godey fashions plate pages, they're newest outfit, the Queen's annual ball, their families, their boyfriends, their engagements, etc. Nothing is off limits. That is, nothing within the reasonable limits of proper Victorian discussion etiquette. Their afternoon teas are held on a rotating basis with each friend hosting the afternoon tea every fourth day. Today, they will all be having tea in Mehitable's parlor.

"Sweet, Sweet Julianna!" is a 13" Victorian square bottomed cloth bodied doll with a gathered waistline, porcelain head, and porcelain arms. She is wearing an 1863 Walking Dress. Julianna has two layers of lace trim along the bottom of her body. Her slip has 2 layers of lace trim along the bottom hem edge and is gathered at the waist. It also has a full length lace over slip that is gathered at the waist as well.

Her 1863 Walking Dress has oversleeves and a finished scalloped lace overskirt. The sleeves are lace trimmed and gathered at the shoulders and wrists. The oversleeves have lace trim along the edge and are also gathered at the shoulders and mid-sleeve. Both her Victorian dress bodice and her dress skirt are gathered at the waist. The finished scalloped lace overskirt is also gathered at the waist. Her neck edge is gathered and covered by a finished doily collar. A lace binding waistband is wrapped around her waist and is tied in a bow in the back. It is decorated in the front with a silk ribbon floral. Julianna is wearing a delicate handkerchief with lace trim as a shawl which is wrapped around her shoulders and tied in the front in a knot. Her frilly, lace trimmed and gathered bonnet sits atop her head and is tied under the right hand side of her chin in a bow.

"Sweet, Sweet Julianna!" is anxious for this afternoon's tea. She has some wonderful news to tell her friends and can hardly wait to do so.

Note: The porcelain head and hands that are pictured are from Midwest Design Imports.

Designer - Linda Walsh Of Linda Walsh Originals

Linda's Book Reviews - Vintage Barbie Dolls -With Barbie & Skipper Fashions and the Whole Family of Barbie Dolls


Since I just wrote an article about Barbie I thought it might be a good idea to review the latest book that I bought on Barbie. It's entitled "The Complete & Unauthorized Guide to Vintage Barbie Dolls® & Fashions (Schiffer Book for Collectors)."

If you are an avid Barbie collector or even just a fan of Barbie dolls this is a great book to scan through.

If you are a collector of mint Barbie dolls this book is a complete guide to vintage Barbie and all her friends and family from 1959 to 1972. It is organized into two sections.

The first section is "Dolls" and shows pictures of the dolls as well as pictures of some of the dolls in their original packaging (which is vital for collectors of mint condition dolls). It also lists values for NRFB (Never Removed From The Box), Mint/No Box value and average value so you can see what your doll is worth. And, there is a detailed list of all the items that were originally included in the doll package.

The second section is "Outfits and Accessories" and shows pictures of the outfits as well as pictures of some of the outfits in their original packaging (which is vital for collectors of mint condition dolls). It also lists values for NRFB (Never Removed From The Box), Mint/No Box value and average value so you can see what the doll's outfit is worth. And, there is a detailed list of all the items that were originally included in the "outfit and accessories" package.

If you are a collector of Barbie this is a "must have." If you're just a fan of Barbie this book is enjoyable as well just to see the way "Barbie" has progressed through the years and what her various values are.

Sunday, March 20, 2016

You've Got To Be Kidding! Women's Rights In the Victorian Era


I wrote this ten years ago.  It still seems appropriate so I thought you might enjoy reading it.

If you're been reading my Linda's Blog for awhile then you know I love history, research, and that I'm a big advocate for women's rights.

You also know that I love the Victorian period and love to design Victorian doll patterns for my Linda Walsh Originals website.

So, I decided to do a little research on Women's Rights (or I should say lack of women's rights) in the Victorian Era and my fascination for that period.

I quickly came to the conclusion that while I love the fashions of the Victorian period, I clearly could never have been a victorian woman and here's why.

The following excerpts were taken from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. "The Victorian Era (1837 to 1901) symbolized by the reign of British monarch Queen Victoria was a very difficult period for women, because of the vision of the "ideal women" shared by most in the society."

"The legal rights of married women were similar to those of children. They could not vote or sue or even own property. Also, they were seen as pure and clean. Because of this view, their bodies were seen as temples which should not be adorned with makeup nor should they be used for such pleasurable things as sex. The role of women was to have children and tend to the house. They could not hold jobs unless they were those of a teacher nor were they allowed to have their own checking accounts or savings accounts. In the end, they were to be treated as saints, but saints that had no legal rights. "

Does this sound like "women should be barefoot, pregnant and in the kitchen" or what? I can't see a modern day woman wanting to tolerate that. No voting, no suing, no property. Must remain pure and clean in body and soul. I don't think so.

"In the Victorian Era the law regarded a married couple as one person. The husband was responsible for his wife and bound by law to protect her. She was supposed to obey him and he had the right to enforce this. The personal property the wife brought into the marriage was then owned by the husband, even in case of a divorce. The income of the wife belonged completely to her husband and the custody of children belonged to the father as well. He was able to refuse any contact between the mother and her children. The wife was not able to conclude a contract on her own. She needed her husband’s agreement. In addition, the married woman could not be punished for certain offences, such as theft or burglary if she acted under the command of her husband. It was impossible to charge the wife for concealing her husband and for stealing from her husband as they were one person in law. "

I can't possibly imagine that any female in her right mind would think that this made sense. Is it any wonder that they wrote "obey" out of the marriage vows of today? Personal property of the wife became the husband's. Can you imagine a husband saying to his wife "What's mine is mine and what's yours is mine, too." And, the wife saying, "Yes, of course, dear!"

During this time women had no legal say in how many children they would have nor would they get custody of children if the marriage ended in divorce. You have to say to yourself, "Were they out of their minds!" No say in how many children you're going to have? I just shake my head.

"A very special connection existed between women and their brothers. Sisters had to treat their brothers as they would treat their future husbands. They were dependent on their male family members as the brother’s affection might secure their future in case their husband treated them badly or they did not get married at all. "

The Victorian men had the Victorian women trapped. If you didn't get married, basically, your brother owned you. If you did get married then your husband owned you.

At that time educated women working in academic jobs were considered abnormal and monstrous. ABNORMAL and MONSTEROUS! I bet all the women professors of today would just love to hear this. The only jobs open to women were governess, servant, teacher at boarding school, nurse or author.

"The attitude towards women and education was that education of women needn’t be the same as that of men. Women were supposed to know the things necessary to bring up their children and to keep house. That’s why subjects as history, geography and general literature were of extreme importance, whereas Latin and Greek were of little importance. Woman who wanted to study something like law, physics, engineering, science or art were satirized and dismissed. People thought that it was unnecessary for women to go to a university. It was even said that studying was against their nature and that it could make them ill. They should stay more or less an “Ornament of Society” and be subordinate to their husbands. Obedience was the only requirement. "

Studying was against their nature and could make them ill. I MUST be very sick then. Ornament of society - NEVER. No wonder the women revolted. No wonder the feminist movement was born out of this period?

But, best of all Victorian women had to be SUBORDINATE to their husbands. All I can say to that is, "You've got to be kidding! My husband would hate that."

Monday, March 14, 2016

HERE'S AN IDEA - Jigsaw Puzzles For Nursery Decor & How-To


I have been in love with  jigsaw puzzles since I was a small child.  From time to time over the years I've solved jigsaw puzzles and then glued them to a piece of cardboard so I could mount them on my bedroom wall for decorations.  Choose a really colorful puzzle and you have a fabulous decoration.

So, when I was creating my baby shower products I decided to create some adorable and colorful baby themed jigsaw puzzles.  You could give them a baby shower favors for the guests to take home and enjoy or you could use them as baby nursery decorations.

Here's how you would create a jigsaw puzzle picture decoration:

How To Create A Jigsaw Puzzle Baby Nursery Wall Decoration


Supplies Needed:

Jigsaw puzzle, 2 large pieces of cardboard for turning the puzzle, 1 piece of cardboard chipboard or 1/8"-1/4" wood for the backing, wood glue, paint, mod podge, brushes, picture hanger.

Instructions:

My Love Affair With Jigsaw Puzzles


I have loved jigsaw puzzles since I was a little girl and can remember sitting and doing them all weekend long. I'd keep at it until I put the whole puzzle together and would then dismantle it and do it again at a later point in time. I never tired of them.

So, of course, I had to make some for my "It's Raining Doll Parties Products Gallery" when they became available. When "The Grays" were setting up their new designs on their "Gray Is Beautiful Products Gallery" they told me we had to have a lot of jigsaw puzzles for the new designs.  So, we did.

And, of course, 'Baby Nicky" and the rest of the "babies" had to have jigsaw puzzles for their "It's Raining Baby Showers Products Gallery."  Since everyone else had puzzles the "Alpaca Cousins" had to have some for their "Alpacas Rock Products Gallery."

It turns out everyone loves them. To say we have a few jigsaw puzzle designs is putting it mildly. Between all 4 product galleries we have many, many designs to choose from.


Sunday, March 13, 2016

Our NEW It's Raining Baby Showers Products Gallery Collections and Categories


Baby Nicky and the "babies" have been working for the last few months on new baby shower products for their  "It's Raining Baby Showers" Baby Store Products Gallery at Zazzle.com and are happy to tell you they're almost done.  They have a few more items to add, but are pleased with all the new graphics and new baby shower product collections they've created.  They hope you're pleased as well.

We have lots of baby shower invitations, favors, and gifts to choose from and have created several product collections for our different graphic lines to make it easier to shop. Each of our collections has been created to include complementing designs within the individual product collections and within our entire "It's Raining Baby Showers" Baby Store Gallery collection.  Our baby store product gallery collections are as follows:


Monday, March 07, 2016

The Sweet Simplicity of Tuck Comb Wooden Dolls

Image Courtesy of Theriaults.com.

While I was doing research  on the "The History of Faceless Dolls" I read several articles about antique wooden dolls and fell in love with Penny Wooden Dolls so much so that I ended up writing a blog post entitled, "I'm In Love With Penny Wooden or Peg Wooden Dolls."

In researching the penny wooden dolls I learned about a special type of peg wooden doll called "tuck comb dolls."  The dolls are so named for their carved and painted hair combs.

According to Wikipedia.org, " Tuck comb dolls are a special style of peg wooden doll, named for their carved hair comb. The head and body is turned as one piece. The hair is usually painted with curled bangs and with a painted comb. Early tuck comb dolls had elongated, graceful proportions, nicely carved details, painted slippers, and sometimes with wood pendant earrings. Some dressed as merchants were called pedlar dolls."

Also, according to The Ultimate Doll Book by Caroline Goodfellow: The high comb, often painted yellow was a fashionable hair ornament and special feature of early 19th century wooden dolls.

I just love these dolls and find them irresistible. I love their adorable painted tuck combs and their clothing. So, of course, I wanted to see more pictures and find out more about these types of peg wooden dolls. Here's what I found and what drew me to each of the dolls:

Tuesday, March 01, 2016

Linda's Book Reviews - Ultimate Doll Book Book#6



Readers of my "Linda's Blog" know that I just love dolls of all kinds, shapes, and sizes. I also love history, especially if it's doll history.

Many, many years ago I bought a book on doll history (the cover is shown in the first picture above) that was supposed to be the "ultimate" book on dolls and doll history. Well, it definitely lived up to its hype.

The Ultimate Doll Book was written by Caroline Goodfellow who is a doll curator.

"The Ultimate Doll Book" is a wonderful treasury of more than 400 different dolls of every type and every time period. It covers the history of dolls from a manufacturing perspective over the last 200 years which was something I was fascinated by. Plus, for the doll collector or someone thinking of starting a doll collection there is some helpful advice for doing so.

There are beautiful, beautiful pictures of all of the various dolls photographed by Matthew Ward contained throughout the book. One of my favorite dolls is the "Old Pretender" pictured on Page 2 and Page 13. She was made in c1680 and it is said that she belonged to the court of King James II. Of course, I just love her and all the rest of the early dolls (circa 1680's to 1820's). Now why is that? Hmmm....

The book is arranged in chronological chapters by manufacturing processes and materials used to make the dolls and starts with Wooden Dolls. This chapter covers Early Dolls (1680's to 1820's), Dolls from the New World (1850's to 1930's), Poupards and Simple Dolls (1800's to present), and Peg Woodens (1790's to present).

The next chapter is Composition Dolls and covers Greiner and German Dolls (1840's to 1900's), Developments in Composition (1850's to 1930's), Alexander Doll Company (1926 to present), and Wax-Over Composition Dolls (1830's to 1900's).

Then we learn the history of and manufacturing of Poured Wax Dolls, Early Dolls ( 1750's to 1850's), English Makers (1850's to 1930's), The Pierotti Family (1770's to 1935), Pierotti Portrait Dolls (1900's to 1930's), and Princess Daisy (1890's).

Next is the history of and manufacturing of Porcelain Dolls, Fancy Glazed China Heads (1830's to 1880's), Plain Glazed China Heads (1840's to 1870's), Fancy Untinted Bisque Heads (1860's to 1880's), and Plain Untinted Bisque Heads (1860's to 1880's.

Following this is Bisque Dolls. We learn about Fashionable Lady Dolls (1860's to 1890's), Developments in Body Types (1860's to 1880's), Jumeau Dolls (1842 to 1958), Bru Dolls (1866 to 1950's), Lady With Wooden Body (1870's), Steiner Dolls (1855 to 1908), The S.F.B.J. and Others (1899 to 1950's), German Marks of Distinction (1860's to 1920's), German Character Dolls (1880's to 1900's), German Doll-Makers (1890's to 1930's), Lady Betty Modish (1902 to 1911), Armand Marseille Dolls (1890's to 1930's), My Dream Baby (1920's to 1930's), Bisque Baby Dolls (1900's to 1990's), Lesser-known German Makers (1900's to 1930's), Ethnic and English Dolls (1860's to 1920's), and Mass-produced Bisque Dolls (1900's to 1940's).

Then we learn the history of Rag Dolls and the American Home Industry (1890's to 1930's), Painted and Sewn Dolls (1880's to 1900's), Printed Cloth Dolls (1900's to 1980's), Steiff Dolls (1900's to present), English Manufacturers (1920's to 1950's), European Manufacturers (1920's to 1950's), and Norah Wellings (1919 to 1960).

Then we are on to the history of and manufacturing of Celluloid Dolls including German Manufacturers (1870's to 1960's) and Mass-produced Dolls (1900's to 1980's).

Modern Dolls is covered next including Voque Dolls, Inc. (1940's to 1960's), American Manufacturers (1900's to present), The Changing Faces of Barbie (1959 to present), English Manufacturers (1950's to 1980's), Sindy and Patch (1960's to present), Baby and Toddler Dolls (1940's to present), Royal Doulton and Nisbet (1980 to 1985), Men and Boys (1960's to present), and New Doll Ideas (1960's to present).

This is followed by the history of National dolls, including Japanese Dolls (1900's to 1960's), Chinese Dolls (1900's to 1950's), Russian Dolls (1800's to present), and Patriotic Character Dolls (1890's to 1918).

The last doll history section concerns the history of Unusual Dolls. This includes Multiple Heads and Faces (1860's to 1980's), Peddler Dolls (1820's to 1990's), and A Master Doll-maker (1970's to present). The latter has to be seen as they are just exquisite.

The final sections of the book contain useful information for the doll collecting enthusiast. It also contains a section on caring for your rare and vintage dolls.

Given that I love dolls, love doll history, and especially love the Victorian Period it was a given that I would love this book. To say it's my favorite doll book would not be an exaggeration. I can read it again, again, and again. I just love dolls. Dolls of all kinds. But, that's me. Maybe after reading Ultimate Doll Book that will be you, too.

Free E-Printables, Coloring Pages, and E-Books For Everyday, Holidays, and Seasons

I love to create free e-patterns, free e-printables, and free e-books for my customers and blog readers and have created several of each.

All of my "freebies" are on my "My Free E-Patterns, E-Printables, E-Tutorials, and E-Books" Pinterest board. If you would like to see my board just CLICK HERE.

All of my free e-patterns, e-printables, e-books & tutorials are also shown below and viewable and downloadable on my Google Drive. 

If you'd like to read or download any of my free e-patterns, e-printables, or e-books just click on the image you want below. You'll be brought to my Linda's Blog post where you'll find a CLICK HERE download link. Click on the download link and you'll be brought to Google Drive where you can view my free e-products. Then just download my free .pdf e-product.

Once my e-product is downloaded to your computer you can save it and print it. You can also save my e-products to your Google Drive. I hope you enjoy my "freebies."


Here's A Nursery Decorating Idea - Jigsaw Puzzles



I have been in love with jigsaw puzzles since I was a small child. From time to time over the years I've solved jigsaw puzzles and then glued them to a piece of cardboard so I could mount them on my bedroom wall for decorations. Choose a really colorful puzzle and you have a fabulous decoration.

So, when I was creating my baby shower products I decided to create some adorable and colorful baby themed jigsaw puzzles.  You could give them a baby shower favors for the guests to take home and enjoy or you could use them as baby nursery decorations.

Here's how you would create a jigsaw puzzle picture decoration:

How To Create A Jigsaw Puzzle Baby Nursery Wall Decoration


Supplies Needed:

Jigsaw puzzle, 2 large pieces of cardboard for turning the puzzle, 1 piece of cardboard chipboard or 1/8"-1/4" wood for the backing, wood glue, paint, mod podge, brushes, picture hanger.

Instructions:

1)  Measure and cut a piece of cardboard, chipboard, or 1/8"-1/4" wood to be the same size as the puzzle.

2)  If you are using 1/8"-1/4" pine board you would want to paint it a complementary color to match your baby nursery colors.  Let the paint dry thoroughly.

3)  Put the jigsaw puzzle together.

4)  Carefully slide the finished puzzle piece onto a piece of cardboard that is larger than your puzzle.

5)  Cover the front of your puzzle with another piece of cardboard that is larger than your puzzle piece to create a sandwich of cardboard and puzzle pieces with the puzzle piece in between.

6)  Turn your puzzle sandwich upside down and then place it on a table.

7)  Remove the larger piece of cardboard that was covering the back of your puzzle so the jigsaw puzzle is turned over with the bottom showing.

8)  Add wood glue to the top of the cardboard, chipboard, or 1/8"-1/4" wood piece until it is fully covered.

9)  Turn the cardboard, chipboard, or 1/8"-1/4" wood piece upside down and glue it to the bottom of your turned over jigsaw puzzle on the table.

10)  Let the wood glue dry thoroughly.

11)  Apply one to two coats of mod podge to the front and sides of the puzzle to seal the picture.

12)  Add a picture hanger to the back of your puzzle picture and hang it on the wall.

We have a lot of different baby themed jigsaw puzzle designs, any of which would look adorable on a baby nursery wall.

Baby Lollipops Decoration Centerpiece Free E-Pattern




I just love baby shower decorations, especially centerpieces.  If you do, too you're going to love our Baby Lollipops Decoration Centerpiece - Free Baby Shower E-Pattern


Spring, Easter and Bunnies Free Tutorials, E-Patterns, Printables and E-Books






Spring is a joyous time of the year.  As a result, I love to create free e-patterns, free e-printables, and free e-books for my customers and blog readers and have created several of each.





























Please respect My Terms of Use:  All patterns, e-patterns, printables, e-printables, e-books, graphics, tutorials, how-to's, articles and other e-products © 2004 - 2019 Linda Walsh Originals-Designs by Linda Walsh. All rights reserved. Commercial selling or reselling by any means prohibited without the written consent of Linda Walsh.

Patterns, e-patterns, printables, e-printables, e-books, graphics, tutorials, how-to's, articles and other e-products are for personal use only. You may not modify, photocopy, download, upload, post, transmit, display, perform, publish, license, reprint, create derivative works from, mass duplicate, re-sell, digitize, and reproduce in any other form (print, digital or electric) or commercially apply, embed, share, Email, or redistribution in any other means. Use of any of the above is prohibited without the written permission of Linda Walsh.

However, you may link to my website(s)/blog(s) and the individual page(s)/blog post(s) (including 1 picture) but do not copy, reprint or duplicate my website(s)/blog(s) or individual page(s)/post(s ) without my permission.

Items made from Linda Walsh Originals E-Patterns are intended for personal use for fun or small scale personal and business profit as long as you credit us with the design. Large scale commercial use (i.e. mass production) of items made from Linda Walsh Originals E-Patterns are by permission only.

Please see my Terms and Conditions for additional information.

Copyright © 2004 - 2019 - All Rights Reserved - Written By Linda Walsh of Linda Walsh Originals and Linda's Blog. Linda is a doll maker and doll pattern designer.

All of my "freebies" are on my "My Free E-Patterns, E-Printables, E-Tutorials, and E-Books" Pinterest board. If you would like to see my board just CLICK HERE.

All of my free e-patterns, e-printables, e-books & tutorials are also shown below and viewable and downloadable on my Google Drive.

If you'd like to read or download any of my free e-patterns, e-printables, or e-books just click on the image you want above. You'll be brought to my Linda's Blog post where you'll find a CLICK HERE download link. Click on the download link. You'll be brought to Google Drive where you can view our free tutorial, e-printable, e-pattern or e-book. Then just print or download our free .pdf tutorial, e-printable, e-pattern or e-book by clicking on the icons in the upper right hand corner.

Once my e-product is downloaded to your computer you can save it and print it. You can also save my e-products to your Google Drive. I hope you enjoy my "freebies."