Thursday, March 19, 2015

Linda's How-Do-I Series? How To Make Our "It's Raining Baby Showers" Tablecloths and Runners Free E-Book From Linda Walsh Originals

Bright and cheery tablecloths and runners make a wonderful decoration for any baby shower. How can they not be when they're filled with bright pink and bright blue baby girl and baby boy colors?

Any of the fabrics in my LWOriginals “It’s Raining Baby Showers” fabric collections at http://www.spoonflower.com/profiles/lworiginals can be used to make tablecloths and runners.

Have fun making your tablecloths and runners.

Supplies Needed:

The amount of fabric you will need will depend upon whether you are making tablecloths or runners, how much you want the tablecloths to overhang the table, how big the tables are, and how many tables you are going to cover.   Measure accordingly then by the number of yards of fabric that  you will need.

Each of our tables and runners have lace around the edges so you should buy enough lace trim to go around all the edges of all the tablecloths and runners you are making and provide a 1 1/2” overlap on the ends..


For the tablecloth pictured above which is 41” by 72” you will need the following:
1 Yard It’s A Girl! It’s A Boy! 4 Designs Squares fabric at  http://www.spoonflower.com/fabric/889314 
1/2” Gathered Lace Trim - 21 Feet Long
Sewing Thread and Sewing Pins
Iron


For the runner pictured above which is 15” by 42” you will need the following:
Baby Nicky Girl and Boy and It’s A Girl! It’s A Boy! Squares fabric at http://www.spoonflower.com/fabric/888811
3/4” Gathered Lace Voile Trim - 12 Feet Long
Sewing Thread and Sewing Pins
Iron

Instructions - Updated March 2015

Lindas's How-Do-I Series? How To Make A Little Sachet Basket Free E-Book


Since I had just finished my Linda's Blog post on the little sachet baskets I had made I thought you might enjoy a step-by-step "How-to" on how to make one of your own. If you'd like to read my post entitled "The Little Potpourri Sachet Baskets" please CLICK HERE.

My pattern and instructions for making the little sachet basket shown in the picture above follow.

Supplies Needed

Package of 1" Long Cinnamon Sticks
Miniature 4" Round Basket (With or Without Handles)
Four Scraps of Fabric - 4 1/2" wide by 10" long
Ten Strips of Scrap Fabric - 8" long by 3/4" wide each
Polyfil
DMC Embroidery Floss
Dual Temperature Glue Gun
Glue Sticks

Instructions - Updated March 2015

(Note - These instructions are for ADULT use only as they require the use of a hot glue gun. Always use caution when working with any kind of hot glue gun.)

1. Cut ten strips of coordinating strips of fabric - each 8" long by 3/4" wide and setaside.

2. Cut the four scrap material pieces into 4 1/2" wide by 10" long rectangles for the bags according to the Sachet Lined Bag Pattern shown below. The bags should be long enough so that you can fold them in half into themselves to create lined bags.



3. With RST (Right Sides Together) and using a 1/4" seam allowance stitch each bag down one of the 10" long sides, across the 4 1/2" wide side and up the remaining 10" long side. Leave the remaining 4 1/2" wide side open for turning.

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Linda’s How-Do-I Series? How To Make Our Alpacas Rock, Babies Splashing In The Rain, It’s Raining Baby Boys, and It’s Raining Baby Girls Custom Fabric Wall Panel Picture New Free E-Book


I just love custom fabric.  Especially when it can be used to make quick and easy picture decorations and was so pleased with the way my Babies In The Pumpkin Patch Wall Panel Picture came out that when I was designing my Babies Splashing In the Rain Fabric Collection and Alpacas Rock Fabric Collection I decided to create several baby fabrics and one alpaca fabric that could be used to create several custom fabric panel pictures.

Last week I finally had some time to create some and decided to start with my Alpacas Brown Panel Fabric which creates a 9” by 12” custom fabric wall panel decoration. It was very easy to make so I proceeded to make my Babies Splashing In The Rain  Fabric Panel Small, my It’s Raining Baby Boys Fabric Panel, and my It’s Raining Baby Girls Fabric Panel.

Here's how I made my Alpacas Rock Custom Fabric Panel Picture:

SUPPLIES NEEDED


For The Alpacas Rock Custom Fabric Panel Picture

Fat Quarter Alpacas Brown Panel Fabric - http://www.spoonflower.com/designs/1951451
9" by 12" Stretched Cotton Canvas (I Used Artist's Loft)
9" by 12" Decorative Heavier Paper-stock For The Backing



For The Babies Splashing In the Rain Custom Fabric Panel Picture

Fat Quarter Babies Splashing In The Rain Fabric Panel-Small -http://www.spoonflower.com/fabric/1623197
11" by 14" Stretched Cotton Canvas (I Used Artist's Loft)
11" by 14" Decorative Heavier Paper-stock For The Backing



For The It’s Raining Baby Boys Custom Fabric Panel Picture

Fat Quarter It’s Raining Baby Boys Fabric Panel - http://www.spoonflower.com/fabric/1621246
8" by 10" Stretched Cotton Canvas (I Used Artist's Loft)
8" by 10" Decorative Heavier Paper-stock For The Backing



For The It’s Raining Baby Girls Custom Fabric Panel Picture

Fat Quarter It’s Raining Baby Girls Fabric Panel - http://www.spoonflower.com/fabric/1620718
8" by 10" Stretched Cotton Canvas (I Used Artist's Loft)
8" by 10" Decorative Heavier Paper-stock For The Backing

Other Supplies Needed For All Four

Staple Gun (I used an Arrow Heavy Duty Staple Gun Tacker Model T50)
1/4" Staples (I used Arrow brand staples)
1 3/4" Picture Hanger With Saw Teeth
Double Sided Tape
Hammer
Paper Cutter (I used a Fiskars Scrapbooking Rotary Paper Trimmer - Deluxe Portable Design With Swing-out Arm)


DIRECTIONS - Updated March, 2015



1) Cut one fabric panel out of the fat quarter.

Linda's How-Do-I Series? How To Make A Fabric Covered Round Basket Free E-Book


Print165 - Linda's How-Do-I Series? How To Make A Fabric Covered Round Basket E-Book

Since I had just finished my Linda's Blog post on the fabric covered baskets I had made I thought you might enjoy a step-by-step "How-to" on how to make one of your own. If you'd like to read my post entitled "During Another Craft Phase - Fabric Covered Baskets" please CLICK HERE.

How To Make A Fabric Covered Basket - Updated March 2015

Supplies Needed

1 Small Round Basket With Handle - 3" Round
1/4 Yard Fabric - 36" Wide
1" Lace Trim - 16" Long
DMC Embroidery Floss
Sewing Thread
Dual Temperature Glue Gun
Glue Sticks
Measuring Tape
Large Plain Piece Of Paper
Iron

Instructions

(Note - These instructions are for ADULT use only as they require the use of a hot glue gun. Always use caution when working with any kind of hot glue gun.)

1. Measure the width of your basket and then measure the height of your basket from the bottom of the basket to the top of the rim. Multiply the height of your basket times 2 and then add this to the width of your basket.

2. Follow the diagram shown below and draw a circle the width + height X2 of your basket on a large plain piece of paper. Draw a circle around your initial circle another 1/2" around for your seam allowance and gathering of your fabric. Now, to this adjusted circle you have just drawn add another 3/4" around for the ruffle.


Monday, March 16, 2015

Blue Bell Sara's - Gray And Fabulous New Designs and Products



How can you be gray and not be "fabulous?" You can't as far as the "grays" are concerned.  They believe aging is not only beautiful but fabulous. Gray hair is not only beautiful, but infinitely fabulous. So, stand up and say "I'm Gray and I'm Fabulous!"

Their adorable new "Gray And Fabulous!" design and new products are for senior citizens, grandma's and grandpa's and are intended for use as gifts and accessories for seniors birthdays, retirement parties, and other special occasions. They have products for home decor, special occasions, home office supplies, clothing, accessories, fun and entertainment, and so much more.

They hope you like their new "Gray And Fabulous!" design and products.

Sunday, March 15, 2015

I've Never Met A Wreath I Haven't Loved


Now I know what you're thinking, "You've never met a wreath you haven't loved. Yeah, right Linda.... you love everything crafty. In fact, there isn't any craft you've met that you haven't loved!" Well, that may be true but wreaths certainly are one of my favorites. I love making them and love decorating with them.

As far as home decorations are concerned you can never have enough wreaths. They're just so much fun to work with and so versatile.

Holiday wreaths, seasonal wreaths, wreaths for special occasions, wreaths of every media - glass, real floral, silk floral, natural greens, wood, painted, paper, metal, ceramic, clay, needle felted, yarn, wool, fabric - even popsicle sticks or lego's. The list is endless.

Wreaths can be shabby chic, romantic, Victorian, primitive, rustic, recycled, contemporary, country, folksy - the list is endless.

Did I mention I love wreaths......   I also love looking at pictures of wreaths that other artists and crafters have created and I'm always amazed at the beautiful designs. I keep thinking that I've seen just about every kind of wreath there is when I'll see a picture of a wreath made out of something I would never have thought of or a new design.

Over the years I've created many, many wreaths of my own and written about some of them on my Linda's Blog.


Back in 2010 I wrote a post entitled "Cloth Wreaths and a Giant Stapler - Sort Of!" which was about making puffy fabric wreaths, like the one shown in the picture above, using an E-Z wreathmaker, which is a tool that allows you to clamp single or double rail clamp-style wreath rings. You know the metal rings with prongs that you see hanging up in the floral section of the craft supply stores. There's no way you can fold the metal prongs down without a large clamp. Think of the E-Z wreathmaker as a giant stapler and you'll get the idea. I ended up making 5 or 6 of these type of wreaths.


I've also dabbled with pressed flowers and ended up making several nature themed pictures using pressed flowers and, of course, one of those was the wreath picture shown above. I wrote about some of my pressed flower creations in a post entitled "My Pressed Flower Pictures - Now That's A Great Idea!"


One of my earliest memories of a wreath being made was the pinecone wreath my mother had made when I was a child and which was a torturous wreath to make. Working with pinecones and wire is not for the faint at heart and certainly not for someone who faints at the sight of blood.  My mother's hands were bloody for days on end from the wire cuts. Her wreath ended up being absolutely beautiful and proudly resided above the fireplace mantle in my parents home for many, many years.

Right now it resides in a box in my basement waiting to be repaired. I promised my mother I would repair it.  Sadly, some of the pinecones have deteriorated over the years. However, it was also the inspiration for the pinecone wreath shown above that I made several years ago and blogged about in a post entitled "My Favorite Pinecone Wreath - I Just had To Make One."  I created a free how-to for making this wreath here.


I also LOVE Pinterest so, of course, one of my many, many pinterest boards is filled with wreath making tutorials, videos, patterns, and how-to's. Right now it has pictures and links to over 800 exceptional wreaths.  I dare you to look at all of the wreaths on my board without wanting to make one, ywo, maybe three - or more....

Follow Wreath Making Tutorials, Video's, Patterns and How-To's Pinterest board on Pinterest.

I, of course, want to make every single one of them, but know that is absolutely out of the question. I can dream - can't I?

I would, however, like to make a few but can't seem to choose which ones.  They're all just so beautiful. I can picture a room with all the walls filled with nothing but wreaths. Can't you?

If you love my Wreath Making Tutorials, Video's, Patterns and How-To's Pinterest board please follow my board by clicking on the SEE ON PINTEREST button on the board above and then clicking on the red FOLLOW BOARD button.

If you would like to follow all of my boards please click on the button below and then click on the red FOLLOW button:

Follow Me on Pinterest

Saturday, March 14, 2015

I'm A Senior Citizen & Proud Of It Retirement and Birthday Party Designs and New Products



The "Grays" have always been proud of being senior citizens. After all, with age comes wisdom, pride, experience, appreciation & beauty of all this world has to offer, and the knowledge of knowing what really matters in life. So, they have no problem letting everyone know they're senior citizens and PROUD of it.

Their adorable new "I'm A Senior Citizen & Proud Of It!" design and new products are for senior citizens, grandma's and grandpa's and are intended for use as gifts and accessories for seniors birthdays, retirement parties, and other special occasions. They have products for home decor, special occasions, home office supplies, clothing, accessories, fun and entertainment, and so much more.

They hope you like their new "I'm A Senior Citizen & Proud Of It!" design and products.

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

We're Just Two Old Bunnies In Love! New Wedding & Wedding Anniversary Designs and Products



Laura, The Qunitessential Bunny and Devin, A Bunny Gentleman are two senior citizen bunnies who have been in love for close to 50 years. Time doesn't seem to matter to them. Their love just keeps getting stronger and stronger every day.

They will be celebrating they're 50th wedding anniversary soon so the "Grays" felt that their love was so special that it should be shared and cherished so they designed new graphics for Laura and Devin.

Their adorable new "We're Just two Old Bunnies In Love" design and new products are for senior citizens, grandma's and grandpa's and are intended for use as gifts, decorations and party accessories for seniors wedding anniversaries and wedding celebrations. They have products for home decor, special occasions, clothing, accessories, fun and entertainment, and so much more.

If you're planning a casual or formal wedding or 50th wedding anniversary celebration they have many, many party products to make your celebration a very special event. From party favors to decorations, paper products, linens, serving dishes, gifts & gift accessories, party invitations, games, and so much more - they have everything you need.

They hope you like their new "We're Just two Old Bunnies In Love!" design and products.

I'm An Independent Pattern Designer - Where Can I Sell My E-Patterns?


I often get asked by independent crafts pattern designers where they can sell their e-patterns so I thought it might be helpful to create a blog post about this.

To give you a little background on me I'm a doll maker and doll pattern designer and have had websites for over 10 years.  I created two of my own websites that I updated to Godaddy via FTP and also managed and maintained two websites that wer hosted through In A Pickle Web Design: one an instant download e-pattern, e-printable, and e-book website using MyCartToGo e-commerce software and Mals-E shopping cart and one selling handmade goods and crafts.

Now I have 1 consolidated Linda Walsh Originals Shop website at Go-Daddy that I maintain that uses a Quick Cart shopping which allows me to sell all my handmade goods and e-products on the same website.  Over the years I've created many, many, many selling and non-selling blogs.

I've been selling my doll and craft patterns and e-patterns online since 2004 and have designed over 350 e-patterns, over 30 e-books, over 20 e-printables, and several e-catalogs. To say I love instant download e-products might be an understatement. I've been in love with .pdf instant download e-products since they first came on the scene in 2004 and have tried all sorts of different venues.

Some I like, some I don't. Some have come and gone, some are free, some are very expensive, some are for specific types of patterns, some are commercial sellers websites, etc. Some are websites that do it all, some are websites that provide html code so you can sell your e-patterns on your website or your blog, some are handmade craft websites where you can list your e-patterns and then send them as an email attachment to your customer, some are websites that provide a download integration for your Etsy shoppe, some are social networking websites that allow for selling, etc. And, some are website designers and e-commerce carts that provide you with the capability of selling instant download e-patterns on your own website.

The online crafts e-pattern, e-printable, and e-book craft industry has been slowly developing over the last decade and, as far as I'm concerned, is still in it's infancy. There's plenty of room for growth and, I'm sure, plenty of room for change. Which venue is best for you is based on what you're selling, what your experience is, what your skill level is, and how much time you can devote to this. Selling e-patterns online as an independent pattern designer is a LONG SLOW process that requires nerves of steel and a lot of PATIENCE. It is not for the faint of heart or those hoping to make a quick buck. That just is not going to happen.

If you’re an artist or crafter who has created e-patterns you might be wondering how you go about selling them. Where do you store your e-patterns and how do you sell instant downloads? Whether its e-patterns or e-books you first need to create a .PDF (Portable Document Format) file which is your electronic product. Once you have created the .PDF file then with the e-patterns there are basically two ways to get the .pdf file to your customer.

1) You can send them yourself as attachments to an email once you have been notified of payment by the customer.

2) They can be sent automatically or available in one's account as "instant download e-patterns" once payment has been made.

So, what kind of online set-up do you need to accomplish this?

1) You can have your own website that has Paypal (or other payment processors) payment buttons capabilities. Once you have received notification from Paypal of payment you can send the e-pattern to your customer as an attachment to an e-mail.

2) You can have a blog that has HTML capabilities in the sidebar or posts that allow you to create Paypal (or other payment processors) payment buttons. Once you have received notification from Paypal of payment you can send the e-pattern to your customer as an attachment to an e-mail.

3) You can have your own website or blog that allows for HTML modules in the sidebar or posts whereby you can copy/paste the BUY NOW digital goods e-commerce shopping cart providers HTML code. In this instance they provide a service whereby they store your e-products on their servers and provide you with a BUY NOW (or similar) button link. When your customer clicks on that Buy Now link then the payment process would begin. Once payment has been made an email will automatically be sent to the customer with the e-pattern download link. They click on the link and follow the prompts to download your e-product. They charge you a fee for this service.

4) You can have your own website that has e-commerce instant download shopping cart capabilities that will send your customer the download link for their e-pattern via email once payment has been made to you.

5) You can have your own website (like my Linda Walsh Originals shop - http://lindawalshoriginalsshop.com) that has e-commerce instant download shopping cart capabilities that will put the download link in the customer's account once payment has been made to you.

6) You can utilize a third-party website with an e-commerce shopping cart provider that has "instant download capabilities." Once payment has been made by the customer the software will automatically generate an email to the customer with the download link. Depending on their set-up you can either: a) upload your .PDF files onto their servers, b) transfer your .PDF files via FTP (file transfer protocol), or c) send them as attachments to an email to them. It all depends on how the e-pattern website is set up. The e-pattern website owners collect payment and then remit to you once they have been paid and have deducted their fee, or they may have a system in place to automatically pay you once the customer has paid. They may charge a monthly fee or charge a % of the sale price and/or both.

7) You can utilize a third-party handmade goods marketplace or community website to create a shop for you to sell your handmade goods and/or e-patterns. Once you have been notified of payment you can send the e-pattern to the customer as an attachment to an e-mail. Sometimes these third-party handmade goods marketplaces or communities have apps that can work in conjunction with your shop and automatically send the customer an email with the e-pattern download link once payment has been made.

If you're an independent crafts pattern designer and you want to sell your e-patterns online, but aren't quite ready for your own website you might want to check out the following websites:

Monday, March 09, 2015

It's Not That Much Longer Until Artful Gathering 2015


It's always delightful when you get an email that brings an immediate smile to your face, takes you a long time to read, and is saved to be read again.

Such was the case with the email from Zinnia Galliher with a link to the Artful Gathering 2015 Workshop Catalog.

This will be my 4th year taking online classes at Artful Gathering and I can hardy wait. I have loved each and every class I've taken there as the instructors are fantastic and the classes are always delightful. I've had a blast in each class learning something new and, best of all, making wonderful new friends.

Last year there were so many fabulous classes to choose from it was hard to decide. This year, based on the workshop catalog in my email, it will be nearly impossible to choose.  There are just SO MANY wonderful online classes that I want to take.

Truth be told, I want to take them all, but that is definitiely not possible. So, choose I must - but, oh, how difficult that will be.

So far I have my eye on the following:

Mary Jane Chadbourne - Session 2 - Tiny Topia & The Magic of Little Things
Rosemary Frew - Session 1 - Baby Carrot - Session 2 - Petit LaPin
Hally Levesque - Session 1- Bonnets & Bows: A Regency Doll Project
Joanna Grant - Session 2 - Mixed Media FX: The Hottest Techniques For The Coolest Effects
Judy Porter - Session 2 - Out On A Whim Art Doll
Susan Myers - Session 2 - Boite A Couture
David H. Everett - Session 1 - Making A Santa Advent Calendar
Lyn Belisle - Session 1 - The Magic Of Spirit Dolls

Session 1 runs from June 6 to July 17 and Session 2 runs from July 16 to August 16,  If you'd like to see the  Artful Gathering 2015 Workshop Catalog click on the picture above or CLICK HERE.

Several months ago Zinnia also created a 2014 Artful Gathering yearbook of last years online retreat. It was filled with event highlights and wonderful pictures of student creations. If you'd like to see the 2014 Artful Gathering Yearbook please click on the picture below or CLICK HERE.


I'm on the back cover (Page 56) with a page filled with pictures of the creations I have made over the last 3 years. If you'd like to see my page online please click on the picture below or CLICK HERE.


If you've always wanted to take an online art and/or craft class you won't be disappointed in any of the Artful Gathering classes.

Hope to see you there.


Sunday, March 08, 2015

The History of Faceless Dolls By Linda Walsh - Introduction, Parts I - Part XXIII and Conclusion - Updated February 2015


I have loved Victorian dolls since I was a little girl and can blame my grandmother for that. You see, as a young girl she gave me a Godey’s Fashion print for August 1870 that belonged to my great, great Aunt Flossie. From that moment on I was hooked. I was captivated by the beautiful dresses and wanted to create dolls wearing them.

Eventually I was able to design my own Victorian "Lady" dolls, like the one pictured on the left, who are all faceless. Now you might be wondering why they are faceless. It's because I wanted each to have its' own distinct personality.

My feeling is that faces overwhelm the dolls personality and have a greater impact on their personality. I wanted the clothing, clothes, hair, color scheme, etc. of the period to determine the personality of the doll.

As far as I am concerned "Beauty lies not only in what is seen, but what is imagined. I believe the essence of a dolls beauty should determine her personality."

You could compare this to the use of mannequins by museums. Most mannequins in museum dress & textile exhibits are either headless or have heads, but they are generally faceless. Or, they have the sculpted definition of facial features but they are not painted. The idea is to not distract from the beauty of the dress or textile piece on display. The same holds true for store window displays.

I have also been a history buff since I was a little girl and loved doing research for history projects all throughout my school years. I especially loved to research everything and anything about the Victorian Era. Their history, their etiquette, their fashion, their hopes, their desires.... In fact, sometimes I think I was born in the wrong era.

Designing handmade faceless dolls was not a novel idea as faceless dolls have been around for a long, long time. However, given my penchant for history I, of course, was curious about the history of faceless dolls. So, back in 2006 I decided to do a little research on the history of faceless dolls and wrote a research article for my Linda's Blog that I subsequently updated in 2009.

I figured that there had to be a history of handmade faceless dolls out there or, at least, some cultures and norms. Believe it or not but there wasn't a lot of information back in 2006 on the web on either the history of faceless dolls or cultures and norms that started such a tradition. There was a little more when I updated my research in 2009.

There was some information on two of the most popular and widely known faceless dolls - Amish dolls and corn husk dolls. And there was the legend surrounding Raggedy Ann and "faceless" dolls.

In doing my research, what I was pleasantly surprised with was the application of "faceless" dolls for so many current charities or organizations. More on that a little later.

I was hoping that now, in 2015, things would have changed a little and there would be more information on their history. I'm happy to report that there is a lot more now and that over the last few years there is a growing trend towards creating faceless dolls in all sorts of doll mediums - which thrills me to no end.

Part of the new trend has to do with creating eco-friendly and nature dolls and part has to do with allowing children to use their imagination more. It also has to do with comforting children facing tough medical situations. Without a face the dolls can be happy or sad, they can be laughing or crying - in essence, they can mimic the emotions of the child holding them. Putting a face on the doll defines the emotion of the doll with the child - which may or may not be comforting.

So, I decided to update my history of faceless dolls research article and include new research as well as some of the new trends. I hope you enjoy it.


I also created a History Of Faceless Dolls .PDF.  If you would like to download my History Of Faceless Dolls .PDF please click here or on the picture below.

Copyright © 2004-2015- All Rights Reserved - Written by By Linda Walsh

I think you all know that I, personally, love faceless dolls. Victorians, primitives, colonial, prairie dolls, rag dolls, or country style dolls. It doesn't matter. I love them all.

In fact, I created a video to reflect my feelings about faceless dolls which is: "Beauty lies not only in what is seen, but what is imagined. I believe the essence of a dolls faceless beauty should determine her personality."

Please CLICK HERE or on the video below if you would like to view my "Linda's Faceless Beauties" video.


Why do I love the faceless doll so much?

Because I think by being "faceless' the doll can be anything you want him or her to be. You create the dolls personality to be exactly what you imagine it to be. Their personality, therefore, reflects your creativity and your feelings.

And, as we've seen from the above mentioned articles the application can be heartwarming, meaningful and beautiful.

In researching doing the research to update my History of Faceless Dolls article I was thrilled to see that there are hundreds of artists and crafters who are now creating various types of "faceless" dolls in all different medium. I couldn't be happier to see all these wonderful new applications for faceless dolls. I'm hoping you all will agree.



Saturday, March 07, 2015

The History Of Faceless Dolls - Updated February 2015 - Part XXIII - Faceless Dolls For Charity and Conclusion


In doing my research on faceless dolls I was delighted to run across some websites concerning the application of "faceless" dolls in charity today and why they were chosen or made "faceless."

Back in 2006 one of those articles was about "faceless" dolls of Gloria Larocque. She has created 100 or more "faceless" dolls based upon the Iroquois legend that warns young girls about the dangers of vanity.

However, according to the article her purpose is different. Her dolls represent Canada's murdered aboriginal women, a group made faceless not by vanity but by neglect. Her project has helped draw attention to the plight of the murdered aboriginal women.

According to Gloria:"The dolls will act as a centre-piece for educating children about traditional Aboriginal culture, maintaining cultural integrity through a contemporary setting. As a teaching tool kit, the idea will be to plant seeds of survival skills concepts such as choice, strength, education, cultural connection and knowledge of self.

The kit will contain a doll in the same fashion as an Aboriginal Angel Doll, and will be presented as an “elder”. The doll will be known as Kookum RETA (grandmother rejuvenate, educate, traditional, acceptance) of the Aboriginal people from Turtle Island. The power of the elder teaching the young is a traditional aboriginal teaching method."


In 2010 the Native Women's Association of Canada (NWAC) contacted Gloria Larocque to explore the possibility of creating a similar project as hers that, "would carry forward the visual representation of strong and beautiful Aboriginal women who have become ‘faceless’ victims of crime. This collaboration resulted in NWAC’s Faceless Doll Project. The dolls created through this new project will be used to create a traveling art exhibit in memory of the more than 600 missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls in Canada. NWAC’s Faceless Doll Project was launched in March 2012 and Community Engagement Workshops were held across the country (funded by the Status of Women Canada). Community members were invited to come and hear the Faceless Doll story and create their very own doll for inclusion in this
commemorative art project. All workshop materials were provided."

The NWAC created a Building On The Legacy Of The NWAC Faceless Doll Project: Create Your Own Faceless Dolls .PDF concerning this initiative and containing information for workshops for groups to create faceless paper dolls in tribute and solidarity of the 600 missing and murdered Aboriginal women. If you would like to see and read the Building On The Legacy Of The NWAC Faceless Doll Project: Create Your Own Faceless Dolls  .PDF please click here.

There was also an article by Brenda Tobias on the Cornell University website concerning Hurricane Katrina and something the alumni did to help the children affected by Hurricane Katrina. A group of 100 alumni got together to sew "faceless" dolls for the children. Doll decorating kits and coloring books were assembled and sent to the children to comfort them.

 The faceless dolls in the picture to the left are part of the Bumbles Dolls project that Maxmilian William Loeffler established as part of a college application essay that turned into a charitable business.

The Bumbles Dolls are small faceless dolls made by volunteers at Bumbles Dolls and donated to charities and hospitals.

The History Of Faceless Dolls - Updated February 2015 - Part XXII- A Very Famous Faceless Doll


Raggedy Ann meets Raggedy Andy for the first time; illustrated by Johnny Gruelle

As far as Raggedy Ann is concerned, one of the legends surrounding her creation is that a little girl was rummaging around her Grandmother's attic and finds a faceless, battered old doll. She brings the doll into her fathers art studio and tells him all about finding it in the attic. He looks at his daughter and the faceless doll and decides to draw a whimsical face on it and then tells her to see if her Grandmother would sew two button eyes on. And so Raggedy Ann was born.